Team Observes Record-Low Densities in Upper Atmosphere

Jun 21, 2010
(a) Daily global-average mass log-density (seasonal and geomagnetic activity effects removed) at a fiducial altitude of 400 km. The dotted horizontal line indicates the minimum overall density. (b) The daily 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7) normalized to 1 AU, in solar flux units (sfu, 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1). (c) Same as (a), but showing the running 81-day average log-densities. The green dashed line shows an estimate of the trend in density for each of the first three solar minima; the final (4th) solar minimum density is 28% lower. (d) Same as (b), but showing the 81-day average F10.7. The horizontal dotted lines in (c) and (d) illustrate the differences between the cycle 23/24 and cycle 22/23 minima.

(PhysOrg.com) -- A team of scientists from the Naval Research Laboratory and George Mason University reports that the Earth's upper atmosphere has recently experienced the lowest density in 43 years. The team has published its findings in a paper entitled "Record-low thermospheric density during the 2008 solar minimum" that appeared in Geophysical Research Letters in June 2010.

The team of Dr. John Emmert and Dr. Judith Lean from NRL's Space Science Division and Dr. Michael Picone from George Mason University were studying the Earth's between 200 and 600 km altitude. Although the air density at these altitudes is only about one-billionth of that at the Earth's surface, it provides sufficient drag on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) objects to cause their eventual reentry. "An operational consequence of this important new finding is that LEO satellites, including debris, may remain in orbit longer than expected," explains Emmert.

To describe their results, the researchers pointed out that the air density at orbital altitudes is ultimately linked to the temperature of the upper atmosphere. A hotter upper atmosphere will expand in vertical extent and increase the air density at a given altitude. The two major factors that control upper atmosphere temperatures are heating via absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the Sun, and cooling via CO2 .

The Sun was unusually quiet during the prolonged of 2007-2009, and the research team found that the associated reduction in solar UV heating can partly explain the reduction in density. Increasing concentrations of CO2 near the Earth's surface are likely making their way into the upper atmosphere and are thus increasing the upper atmosphere cooling efficiency. However, it is not yet clear whether the combination of reduced solar UV heating and enhanced CO2 cooling can fully account for the occurrence of the anomalously low thermospheric density, and the researchers suggested that changes in upper atmospheric chemistry and composition may have also contributed to the record-low density.

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User comments : 4

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gmurphy
1 / 5 (1) Jun 22, 2010
erm, cooling via CO2 infrared emission?, isn't CO2 associated, somewhat controversially with infrared absorption?
Yvan_Dutil
5 / 5 (2) Jun 22, 2010
CO2 heat the lower atmosphere and cool the upper atmosphere. This is an observed phenomenon predicted by the radiative transfert theory.

This is like a bed sheet: it keeps you warm but prevents you to heat the room.
GSwift7
3 / 5 (2) Jun 22, 2010
Don't get away from the main point. The primary cause of the 40 year cooling trend is the solar min/max cycle, according to the above article.

Once again though, you must realize that they are showing you normalized data, meaning that it's only a best-guess estimate. Be very careful when reading this kind of stuff.

"seasonal and geomagnetic activity effects removed"

Someone had to make a best-guess judgement call about the magnitude of those effects in order to remove them. That can easily create a trend that doesn't really exist. Are we actually observing satelites and space junk staying in orbit longer than expected? They didn't speak of any such observations.
thermodynamics
3 / 5 (2) Jun 22, 2010
gmurphy: Molecular absorption and emission are identical (at a specific wavelength) due to the quantum mechanical vibrations and rotations that cause them and restrict the response wavelengths. There is a thicket of absorption lines for all materials (in different locations depending on the material and if it is vibration/rotation or ionization). That thicket of lines gives us the bands for absorption and emissions. By the laws of quantum mechanics the same lines that show up for absorption are repeated for emission. What can happen though is that a molecule can hit another while it is excited and change states so that it can emit at a different wavelength than it absorbed in. I hope that is clear. If not, let me know what I need to do to make it more clear. Bottom line is that if a molecule absorbs a specific wavelength it can emit that same wavelength.