British man convicted for Twitter bomb 'threat'

May 10, 2010

(AP) -- A court has convicted a British man of sending a menacing electronic communication for saying on Twitter that he would blow up an airport.

A judge at Doncaster Magistrates' Court ordered Paul Chambers to pay 1,000 pounds ($1,500) in a fine and costs.

Chambers was arrested in January after he posted a message on the micro-blogging site saying he would blow Robin Hood Airport "sky high" if his flight was delayed.

The 26-year-old Chambers said the message was a joke.

The airport decided it was not a credible bomb threat, but passed the message on to police.

Chambers had pleaded not guilty to sending an offensive, indecent, obscene or menacing message over a public telecommunications network.

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