More of Gulf closed to fishing because of spill

May 07, 2010
Oil is seen on the water from the deck of the Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill containment efforts in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Lousiana Friday, May 7, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

(AP) -- Federal officials have expanded an area that is off-limits to fishing because of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday an area from the Southwest Pass of the to south of Pensacola, Fla., is now closed. NOAA spokeswoman Christine Patrick said the initial closure was 6,814 square miles and the new area is 10,807 square miles.

Late Thursday, Louisiana officials closed shrimping in state waters from South Pass of the Mississippi to the eastern shore of Four Bayous Pass just east of Grand Isle.

Earlier, state waters east of the Mississippi were closed to seafood harvesting.

Explore further: Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on wildlife

4.5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fishing ban imposed in oil-affected Gulf of Mexico

May 02, 2010

Louisiana's 2.4-billion-dollar a year commercial and recreational fishing industry is dealt its first major blow from the oil spill as the US government bans activities for 10 days due to health concerns.

Federal agencies say seafood safe

Dec 10, 2005

Federal officials and officials from Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana say there is no reason to be concerned over eating Gulf states seafood.

'Dead zone' area shrinking

Sep 30, 2004

A team of Texas A&M University and Louisiana State University scientists conducted a research cruise in late August to the "dead zone" - a region in the northern Gulf of Mexico that suffers from low oxygen and results in hu ...

Recommended for you

Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay

16 hours ago

In a paper published online today in the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature, Northeastern researchers Evan Kodra and Auroop Ganguly found that while global temperature is indeed increasing, so too is the variab ...

Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon

16 hours ago

Today scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Perú. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change ...

How might climate change affect our food supply?

17 hours ago

It's no easy question to answer, but prudence demands that we try. Thus, Microsoft and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have teamed up to tackle "food resilience," one of several themes ...

Groundwater is safe in potential N.Y. fracking area

18 hours ago

Two Cornell hydrologists have completed a thorough groundwater examination of drinking water in a potential hydraulic fracturing area in New York's Southern Tier. They determined that drinking water in potable ...

User comments : 0