Russian sun probe lost: official

Apr 19, 2010

Russian scientists acknowledged Monday that solar research satellite Koronas-Foton has been lost due to technical problems, barely a year after its launch.

The probe, also known as CORONAS-Photon, was launched into orbit by Russia on January 30, 2009 but lost connection with its controllers at the end of the year when a problem with its led to battery failure.

"The probe has not functioned for almost five months which allows us with a good deal of certainty to announce its final death," said its creators, the Laboratory of X-Ray Astronomy of the Sun of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

It said that in early April the probe's batteries had the chance to be well charged by the sun but it still failed to make contact with the earth.

The probe had hoped to investigate energy accumulation in the sun's atmosphere, and the relationship between and magnetic storms on Earth.

Explore further: Cassini sees sunny seas on Titan

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The Sun Loses its Spots

Jul 24, 2007

While sidewalks crackle in the summer heat, NASA scientists are keeping a close eye on the sun. It is almost spotless, a sign that the Sun may have reached solar minimum. Scientists are now watching for the ...

Battery Wrapped in Solar Cells Recharges in the Sun

Mar 02, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Although you can buy solar charging devices for rechargeable batteries, it would be even more convenient if batteries had built-in solar cells. Sitting in sunlight, the battery could then ...

Halloween Storms of 2003 Still the Scariest

Oct 29, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- By the eerie light of a Halloween moon, while a chilly wind blows autumn-dry leaves askitter on bare and fingered branches, scary things can happen. Blood-sucking bats, creepy-crawly spiders, ...

Scientists bid adieu to plucky solar probe

Jun 30, 2009

US and European scientists were Tuesday bidding farewell to the tenacious solar probe Ulysses which has been recording data around the sun for more than 18 years, four times longer than planned.

Recommended for you

Cassini sees sunny seas on Titan

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —As it soared past Saturn's large moon Titan recently, NASA's Cassini spacecraft caught a glimpse of bright sunlight reflecting off hydrocarbon seas.

Is space tourism safe or do civilians risk health effects?

11 hours ago

Several companies are developing spacecraft designed to take ordinary citizens, not astronauts, on short trips into space. "Space tourism" and short periods of weightlessness appear to be safe for most individuals ...

An unmanned rocket exploded. So what?

14 hours ago

Sputnik was launched more than 50 years ago. Since then we have seen missions launched to Mercury, Mars and to all the planets within the solar system. We have sent a dozen men to the moon and many more to ...

NASA image: Sunrise from the International Space Station

14 hours ago

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman posted this image of a sunrise, captured from the International Space Station, to social media on Oct. 29, 2014. Wiseman wrote, "Not every day is easy. Yesterday was a tough one. ...

Copernicus operations secured until 2021

15 hours ago

In a landmark agreement for Europe's Copernicus programme, the European Commission and ESA have signed an Agreement of over €3 billion to manage and implement the Copernicus 'space component' between 2014 ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

omatumr
1 / 5 (5) Apr 19, 2010
I deeply regret to see a solar probe by Russia or any other country lost.

The results of solar probes by NASA and ESA are IMHO suspect because these agencies have manipulated or hidden data in the past to try to protect the illusion that the Sun is a giant ball of Hydrogen [See: "The Sun is a plasma diffuser that sorts atoms by mass," Yadernaya Fizika 69, number 11, (Nov 2006); PAC: 96.20.Dt].

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Emeritus Professor
Nuclear & Space Science
Former NASA PI for Apollo

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.