Japan astronaut solves bubble puzzle

Apr 15, 2010

Of all the experiments Japanese astronaut Naoko Yamazaki has carried out in space -- making sushi in a kimono and playing a harp -- blowing soap bubbles has arguably brought the biggest breakthrough.

Yamazaki, Japan's second female astronaut and its first mum-in-space, is part of the crew that joined a team on the (ISS) last week in the latest mission for US .

The trip put more women in orbit than ever before on a mission to deliver nearly eight tonnes of cargo, including spare bunks for the space station occupants, a tank of ammonia coolant and .

But mission specialist Yamazaki had her own agenda after promising her daughter she would solve a mystery puzzling the sharp-minded seven-year-old: why coloured bubblebath makes colourless soap bubbles in water.

Yamazaki on Wednesday mixed red tropical fruit juice with soap and blew shiny red bubbles in space to the delight of her daughter Yuki, who watched with the astronaut's husband Taichi on a video phone, Jiji Press said.

The experiment worked because space's zero-gravity environment allowed colour pigments to spread evenly around a bubble, said Yamazaki's husband.

The latest experiment follows a tradition of Japanese astronauts testing left-field ideas in , ranging from trying out a flying carpet to applications of eye drops.

Explore further: Astronauts to reveal sobering data on asteroid impacts

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Photic
not rated yet Apr 28, 2010
Didn't the inventors of zubbles already discover this?

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