GOES-12 captures south Atlantic Tropical Storm 90Q far from Argentina's coast

Mar 12, 2010
The GOES-12 satellite captured a visible image of South Atlantic's Tropical Storm 90Q at 1745 UTC (12:45 p.m. ET) off Argentina's coast. Credit: NASA GOES Project

The second-ever known tropical cyclone in the South Atlantic Ocean can't escape satellite eyes, and today, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-12 captured a visible image of Tropical Storm 90Q now located off the coast of Argentina.

GOES-12 satellite captured an image of 90Q at 1745 UTC (12:45 p.m. ET) today, March 12, when it was more than 1,350 miles east of Buenos Aires, Argentina, approximately near 36.5 degrees South latitude and 34.8 degrees West longitude. At 10 a.m. ET today, Tropical Storm 90Q still had near 46 mph (40 knots).

GOES-12 is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and images are created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Tropical Storm 90Q is now moving quickly in a southeasterly direction and is starting to interact with a mid-latitude frontal system. By the end of the weekend, the Southern Atlantic Ocean's second tropical storm in recorded history is expected to be merged with a cold front and just remain in the history books.

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DachpyarviIe
3 / 5 (2) Mar 12, 2010
Typical NASA, how can they say they capturedthe storm when they haven't used a reliable control method. Next the AGW crowd will be telling us this rare storm is caused by the record high tropospheric temperatures! Well for them, it's not a unique storm...it's the 2nd storm recorded :)
mikehevans
not rated yet Mar 13, 2010
Still pretty unique (pardon the grammar). Since we have only been looking at the South Atlantic for a very short time, my guess is that there have been storms in the past that we did not see or know about. Conditions are definitely not as favorable for storm formation as in the North Atlantic, by more than an order of magnitude.

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