Most sea lions gone from Ore. coast

Mar 04, 2010
About one dozen sea lions are shown on docks near Pier 39 in San Francisco, Tuesday, March 2, 2010. After an abrupt disappearance that left tourists disappointed and experts baffled, sea lions are slowly returning to San Francisco's Pier 39. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

(AP) -- The thousands of California sea lions that showed up this winter off the central Oregon coast seem to have largely moved on.

In San Francisco, last fall's abrupt disappearance of the creatures left tourists disappointed. Now they're slowly returning to San Francisco's Pier 39.

While the sea lions range widely, the mass exodus of most of a of about 1,700 was puzzling. Some scientists suggest perhaps they simply headed north looking for food.

The Oregonian reports that schools of such as anchovies and sardines were ample off Oregon. One photo taken this winter off Oregon's Lost Beach between Caves and Heceta Head showed thousands of the animals.

Explore further: Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife

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