Intel, IBM roll out new computer network chips

Feb 09, 2010
US technology titans IBM and Intel have rolled out powerful new computer chips designed for businesses continually demanding more from networks and data centers.

US technology titans IBM and Intel have rolled out powerful new computer chips designed for businesses continually demanding more from networks and data centers.

Intel introduced an Itanium 9300 series developed under the code name "Tukwila" that it touts as delivering twice the performance of prior generation chips.

The 9300 series features two billion transistors per chip and four "cores," mini-brains that process data.

"With the Gartner Group predicting a 650 percent growth in IT data over the next five years, businesses need increasingly powerful and scalable enterprise servers," Intel said in a release.

Intel also said the chips are built to improve the ability of computer systems to recover from otherwise fatal errors.

IBM launched new Power7 built to manage intensely demanding computing environments such as smart electrical grids or real-time financial markets analysis.

Power 7 chips at the heart of the systems perform four times as fast as the previous generation Power 6 microprocessors, tending to 32 tasks simultaneously, according to IBM.

Power 7 systems incorporate technology tailored for services that rely on "processing an enormous number of concurrent transactions and data while analyzing that information in real time," IBM said.

"In addition, the new systems enable clients to manage current applications and services at less cost with technology breakthroughs in virtualization, energy savings, and more cost-efficient use of memory," according to IBM.

The announcements by Intel and IBM come as Oracle weighs into the market by acquiring in a deal valued at 7.4 billion dollars.

Oracle has vowed to put its resources behind improving and marketing Sun Solaris server systems built on SPARC technology.

Explore further: Intel takes aim at the mobile market — again

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

IBM Unveils New Dual-Core X3 Servers

Nov 01, 2005

IBM is upgrading its X3 Architecture-based family of servers with the introduction today of new, dual-core systems based on the dual-core Intel Xeon processor 7000 sequence, formerly code named "Paxville MP." X3 Architecture-based ...

IBM Extends Deep Computing on Demand Offering

Jun 21, 2007

IBM today expanded its Deep Computing Capacity on Demand (DCCoD) solutions. In a collaboration with Intel, IBM plans to offer the latest Dual-Core and Quad-Core Intel Xeon processor technology on its System x servers for ...

Recommended for you

DARPA seeks new positioning, navigation, timing solutions

17 hours ago

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), writing about GPS, said: "The military relies heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), but GPS access is easily blocked by methods such as jamming. In addition, many environments in which our mil ...

Future US Navy: Robotic sub-hunters, deepsea pods

21 hours ago

The robotic revolution that transformed warfare in the skies will soon extend to the deep sea, with underwater spy "satellites," drone-launching pods on the ocean floor and unmanned ships hunting submarines.

Festo has BionicANTs communicating by the rules for tasks

Mar 27, 2015

Germany-based automation company Festo, focused on technologies for tasks, turns to nature for inspiration, trying to take the cues from how nature performs tasks so efficiently. "Whether it's energy efficiency, ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Buyck
not rated yet Feb 09, 2010
They will use the new Power7 serie into "Blue Waters" supercomputer with at least 10 Petaflop performance online next year! And use the same Power7 series in "Sequoia" 20 Petaflop system. We life in exciting times. I'm amazed what IBM can do! Can not even wait to Power8, 22nm processor in 2013.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.