IBM Extends Deep Computing on Demand Offering

June 21, 2007

IBM today expanded its Deep Computing Capacity on Demand (DCCoD) solutions. In a collaboration with Intel, IBM plans to offer the latest Dual-Core and Quad-Core Intel Xeon processor technology on its System x servers for users who rent compute time at IBM’s hosted DCCoD centers.

The offering is targeted primarily at financial markets customers, who require additional, high-performance computing power to run intraday and post-trading analytics, for example. The IBM/Intel platform offers a fast, highly secure addition to companies’ computing infrastructure which can be used on a flexible basis. The solution can be purchased in increments as small as eight hours a day, five days a week.

“Companies are facing increasing limitations – primarily around space constraints and power consumption -- when it comes to adding high-performance infrastructure,” said David Gelardi, vice president of Deep Computing, IBM. “This new extension of our DCCoD offering provides companies with the flexibility to access horsepower as necessary, while allowing them to conserve the footprint of their data center and avoid new energy expenditures.”

“Collaborating with IBM on this high-performance computing service based on the latest Intel Quad-Core Xeon processor technology will drive the benefits of this combined computing technology to where the financial markets and other industries will benefit the most – directly to their bottom lines,” said Richard Dracott, general manager, Intel High Performance Computing Group.

The expanded Intel/IBM offering will be initially available at IBM’s DCCoD center in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. IBM maintains other DCCoD centers in Rochester, Minn. and two in London, England, with a total of more than 14,000 processors. The centers enable customers to easily tap into IBM-owned and hosted high-performance resources on a flexible and secure basis and benefit from a pay-as-you-go arrangement. With a number of industries facing issues of constrained data center resources and high energy costs, DCCoD can help mitigate issues of space, power and cooling.

DCCoD can help a broad spectrum of companies that have peaks and valleys in their need for supercomputing power. Commercial industries that have benefited from supercomputing power on demand include biotech research companies, financial services organizations, government agencies and national research laboratories.

For more information visit www.ibm.com/servers/deepcomputing/cod

Source: IBM

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