Cassini Spacecraft to Monitor North Pole on Titan

Dec 28, 2009
Artist concept of NASA's Cassini spacecraft flying by the north polar region of Saturn's moon Titan on Dec. 27. Image credit: NASA/JPL

(PhysOrg.com) -- Though there are no plans to investigate whether Saturn's moon Titan has a Santa Claus, NASA's Cassini will zoom close to Titan's north pole this weekend.

The flyby, which brings to within about 960 kilometers (600 miles) of the Titan surface at 82 degrees north latitude, will take place the evening of Dec. 27 Pacific time, or shortly after midnight Universal Time on Dec. 28.

The encounter will enable scientists to gather more detail on how the lake-dotted north polar region of Titan changes with the seasons. Scientists will be using high-resolution radar to scan the large and numerous lakes in the north polar region for shape-shifting in size and depth. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer team will take baseline measurements of the atmosphere to compare with the moon's south polar region when Cassini flies by that area on Jan. 12. Cassini will also be collecting images for a mosaic of a bright region called Adiri, where the Huygens probe landed nearly five years ago.

Cassini will have released the Huygens probe exactly five years and three days before this latest flyby. Huygens began its journey down to Titan on the evening of Dec. 24, 2004 California time, or early Dec. 25 Universal Time, and reached the surface Jan. 14, 2005.

Cassini last flew by Titan on Dec. 11, 2009 California time, or Dec. 12 Universal Time. Although this latest flyby is dubbed "T64," planning changes early in the orbital tour have made this the 65th targeted of Titan.

Explore further: Video gives astronaut's-eye view inside NASA's Orion spacecraft

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User comments : 4

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omatumr
3 / 5 (1) Dec 29, 2009
Intriguing!

What is the composition of the lakes in the "the lake-dotted north polar region of Titan."

Don't seasonal changes decrease with distance from the Sun?

Intriguing,

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
High_Evolutionary
1 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2009
Intriguing!

What is the composition of the lakes in the "the lake-dotted north polar region of Titan."
I believe it should be uniform throughout Titan.
As the seasons change o Titan liquid methane and variables of it sublimate and rain down on Titan much like we have rain here on earth.
Don't seasonal changes decrease with distance from the Sun?

Intriguing,

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel

High_Evolutionary
not rated yet Dec 30, 2009
The seasons on Titan go through a (I believe) 9 year period and the lakes are pretty much made up of methane and derivatives of it which are rained down on the moon after sublimation.
austux
not rated yet Dec 31, 2009
Titan has some amazing similarities to Venus (like thick atmosphere, relatively even temperature, "fresh" surface).

It will be interesting to see if even more are unveiled after the data have been considered.

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