Missile defense test aborted when target fails

Dec 12, 2009

(AP) -- The Missile Defense Agency says a planned test of a ground-based missile defense system in Hawaii was aborted because the target missile failed.

The agency said in a statement Friday that a C-17 airplane successfully deployed the target but the target's didn't ignite.

A missile interceptor fired from the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai was supposed to shoot down the target. But it didn't launch when the target missile didn't ignite.

The agency says it's investigating why the target missile failed.

The Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system is designed to shoot down ballistic missiles in their last stage of flight.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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