Windows 7 Virtual XP Mode

Apr 28, 2009 by John Messina weblog
Windows 7

(PhysOrg.com) -- Microsoft has decided to give Windows 7 users a tool that will allow them to run Windows XP applications in a virtual machine. The tool is free with Windows 7 but will only be available to users of Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate and Enterprise Editions.

Microsoft made it clear about XPM's purpose. "Windows XP Mode is specifically designed to help small businesses move to Windows 7," Scott Woodgate, the director of Windows enterprise and virtualization strategy, said in a blog entry last Friday.

Michael Cherry, an analyst with Directions on stated; "I think that this will help the uptake for Windows 7, because it removes one more 'gotcha, and that's never a bad thing to do." Microsoft sees XPM mode more as a safety net for users concerned about abandoning XP who don't have access to the centrally-managed MED-V (Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization).

Microsoft sees this has a smart and necessary move after the welcome users gave to Windows Vista. Microsoft feels that this will give business additional time to gear up to Windows 7 while still being able to run their old applications in XPM mode.

Michael Silver, an analyst with Gartner Inc., sees some big draw backs to this temporary compatibility fix. "You'll have to support two versions of Windows," he said. "Each needs to be secured, anti virus , firewalled and patched. Businesses don't want to support two instances of Windows on each machine. If a company has 10,000 PCs, that's 20,000 instances of Windows."

Another big problem Silver foresees with XPM is that business may neglect the real problem of trying to make sure their applications are compatible with Windows 7. Silver went on to say: "This is a great Band-Aid, but companies need to heal their applications. They'll be doing themselves a disservice if, because of XPM, they're not making sure that all their applications support Windows 7."

Microsoft is extending the lifespan of Windows XP by offering it as a Windows 7 add-on, however there is no budget for support. Microsoft discontinued support for Windows XP two weeks ago and is only offering "extended" support through mid-April 2014.

XPM will give some companies a false sense of security. What will happen in mid-April 2014 when XP isn't supported anymore? Companies would be better off if they make all their applications run on Windows 7.

Microsoft will be shipping a beta of XPM soon, but has not given a specific date to its availability. 7 Release Candidate (RC) will be available to users of its MSDN and TechNet services on Thursday, and to the public on May 5.

© PhysOrg.com

Explore further: Technology to help people with disabilities to learn and communicate

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What's The Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 3 All About

Dec 14, 2007

Microsoft has announced an upcoming Windows XP Service Pack 3. There is a test version available. The Windows XP SP3 is primarily a package of previously released updates, security updates and hotfixes. However, ...

Microsoft Announces Windows Mobile 6.5

Feb 17, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- At the Mobile World Congress 2009 in Barcelona, Microsoft officially revealed the new Windows phones featuring new user-friendly software and services. The next generation of Windows phones ...

Emails show Microsoft's Vista problems

Feb 29, 2008

E-mails suggest Microsoft executives struggled to make Windows Vista work on their own computers after it was released, a published report said.

Recommended for you

BPG image format judged awesome versus JPEG

Dec 17, 2014

If these three letters could talk, BPG, they would say something like "Farewell, JPEG." Better Portable Graphics (BPG) is a new image format based on HEVC and supported by browsers with a small Javascript ...

Atari's 'E.T.' game joins Smithsonian collection

Dec 15, 2014

One of the "E.T." Atari game cartridges unearthed this year from a heap of garbage buried deep in the New Mexico desert has been added to the video game history collection at the Smithsonian.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

axemaster
3 / 5 (2) Apr 29, 2009
"This is a great Band-Aid, but companies need to heal their applications. They'll be doing themselves a disservice if, because of XPM, they're not making sure that all their applications support Windows 7."

Shouldn't it be the other way around? Shouldn't Windows support the apps?
Jat
1 / 5 (2) May 01, 2009
Axemaster, the operating system is there as an interface between your apps and your 'unique' PC hardware.

You are suggesting that Windows, which is written by one company, makes its product compatible with all the thousands of software developers apps worldwide, instead of the developers writing their software to work on a particular OS. There is responsibility for compatibility from both sides, not just Microsoft.
superhuman
not rated yet Jun 11, 2009
You are suggesting that Windows, which is written by one company, makes its product compatible with all the thousands of software developers apps worldwide


No, backwards compatible with their own system.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.