Alaska's Mount Redoubt spews ash 50,000 feet high

Mar 28, 2009
An ash cloud from the eruption of Redoubt volcano rises above the horizon in Homer, Alaska, Thursday, March 26, 2009. The eruption Thursday morning sent an ash cloud 65,000 feet above sea level, the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported. (AP Photo/Kenai Peninsula Clarion, McKibben Jackinsky)

(AP) -- Alaska's Mount Redoubt has erupted again, spewing an ash cloud 50,000 feet up into the air.

The Observatory in Anchorage says the volcano had a significant eruption at 1:20 a.m. Saturday. The ash is expected to move north toward the Alaska Range, missing Anchorage which is about 100 miles from the volcano.

The observatory says after the eruption, it detected strong lasting 20 minutes or more followed by an hours-long low-level tremor.

Since the series of eruptions began Sunday night, the volcano has had about a dozen bursts. The last time the volcano erupted was during a four-month period in 1989-90.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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