P2P traffic control

Jan 07, 2009

Could a concept from information technology familiar to online file sharers be exploited to reduce road congestion and even traffic accidents? That is the question answered in the affirmative by researchers in California, writing in the International Journal of Vehicle Information and Communication Systems.

Trevor Harmon, James Marca, Pete Martini, and Raymond Klefstad of the University of California, Irvine, explain that one of the key failings of modern transport systems is the inept collection and distribution of usable traffic information. According to one US survey, they point out that less than a third of signaled intersections on arterial roads had any form of electronic surveillance. In other words, around 70% of all traffic lights have no electronic monitoring and this does not take into account the regions between traffic signals.

"The unfortunate consequence is," they say, "that, even if every highway were fully and accurately monitored, drivers attempting to plot an alternative route around an incident would have virtually no information about conditions on the arterial street network."

They explain that there is research currently underway to address this issue using local-area wireless technology. This technology will allow vehicles to form an ad hoc network that can exchange timely information about traffic conditions, incidents, and accidents. The research team has a vision for such a traveler-centric, zero-infrastructure system they have named Autonet. This network would share information through a peer-to-peer (P2P) system akin to those used by file sharers on the internet but exchanging useful traffic information rather than music and video files.

The team has already carried out a validation of the Autonet system. In the prototype based on readily available 802.11b wireless technology, they explain, an in-vehicle computer "client" with an informative graphical user interface (GUI) continuously monitors other nearby clients on the wireless network, exchanging knowledge about local road conditions.

The system can handle measurements for approximately 3,500 traffic incidents for two vehicles passing each other at highway speeds, the team asserts. They point out that not all the wireless clients in the network need be vehicles, roadside monitoring posts could be embedded in the network too.

Paper: "Design, implementation and test of a wireless peer-to-peer network for roadway incident exchange" in Int. J. Vehicle Information and Communication Systems, Vol. 1, Nos. 3/4, pp 288-305

Source: Inderscience Publishers

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User comments : 2

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PaulLove
3 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2009
Sooo bets on if a system like this were implemented it would be less than 24hr before there was a hack to clear traffic in front of you and favor speeding your car down the road. This would be the second attack on the system the first being the built in design feature to allow government official vehicle or those who can afford to pay for "premium" driving packages for their car.
seanpu
not rated yet Jan 09, 2009
True PaulLove, but i like the idea!

Frankly, i feel this system has a lot going for it. Their major concern was

1) the system can handle about 3500 incidents at any one time
2) it doesn't accommodate things like traffic lights.

For (2) as they say they can sort that out later using other traffic information in a more comprehensive programming effort.

For (1) 3500 incidents really is too much anyway, and this represents the total possible reliable throughput.

I feel that at most about 200 incidents would apply to any one session of driving, most of which will relate to each other. For example, 5 cars report stopping at GPS positions within a couple meters of each other, is actually ONE incident, so the Node code must sort and link received info and rebroadcast its *evaluated* incident report, being much less than 200.

I feel this project has legs and there would be Open Source versions of this too! In fact open source would probably be the first available.

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