Bronze age necklace unearthed

Dec 01, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- A 4,000-year-old amber necklace has been discovered at a dig organised by a team of archeologists in Manchester.

The rare find was unearthed from a stone-lined grave – known as a Cist - excavated by the team from The University of Manchester Field Archaeology Centre and Mellor Archaeological Trust.

It is the first time a necklace of this kind from the early Bronze Age has been found in north west England.

Peter Noble from The University of Manchester said: “An amber necklace of this sort was one of the most important ways that people of the early Bronze Age could display their power and influence.

“The fact that it has been found in the north west of England is pretty amazing and extremely rare.”

Dozens of different sized pierced amber beads are linked together on a length of fibre to form the beautiful artifact.

It was discovered by Vicky Nash from of the Mellor Archaeological Trust.

Peter Noble, who directed the dig added: “The necklace was made of amber – which is not found in this region.

“In fact, the nearest source is in the Baltic so we’re bound to ask, how did it get here and who brought it?”

Provided by University of Manchester

Explore further: Team discovers first evidence of milk consumption in ancient dental plaque

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