Serial cohabiters less likely than others to marry

Nov 06, 2008

A new study in the Journal of Marriage and Family found that serial cohabiters are less likely than single-instance cohabiting unions to result in marriage. Similarly if serial cohabiters marry, divorce rates are very high.

Daniel T. Lichter of Cornell University and Zhenchao of Ohio State University used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to track the experiences of serial cohabiters, or women who have cohabited with more than one partner.

Serial cohabiters were less likely than couples who cohabited only once to end in marriage. If serial cohabiters did marry, divorce rates were very high – more than twice as high as for women who cohabited only with their eventual husbands.

Results indicate that only a minority of cohabiting women (15 to 20 percent) were involved in multiple cohabitations. Also, serial cohabitations were overrepresented among economically disadvantaged groups, especially those with low income and education.

"Understanding the myriad motivations of cohabiters may be more important than ever, especially if cyclical serial cohabiting couples with children have increased among recent cohorts as a percentage of all cohabitations," Lichter notes.

Source: Wiley

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Mauricio
not rated yet Nov 06, 2008
Hymens have a function.... that is why people who marry their school mates, stay married more likely than those who are "free" and "enjoy" life at fullest... I am in the second case, unfortunately, but I know that I am in the wrong track in regards to married life.
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (1) Nov 06, 2008
Hymens have a function....


Yes, it is called "covenant" and a "covenant" is permanent.

If a person cannot be trusted with a little, why should anyone expect them to be trusted with a lot?

"Enjoy life to its fullest" is a PC phrase for "live like the devil and have no conscience about it".

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