Serial cohabiters less likely than others to marry

Nov 06, 2008

A new study in the Journal of Marriage and Family found that serial cohabiters are less likely than single-instance cohabiting unions to result in marriage. Similarly if serial cohabiters marry, divorce rates are very high.

Daniel T. Lichter of Cornell University and Zhenchao of Ohio State University used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to track the experiences of serial cohabiters, or women who have cohabited with more than one partner.

Serial cohabiters were less likely than couples who cohabited only once to end in marriage. If serial cohabiters did marry, divorce rates were very high – more than twice as high as for women who cohabited only with their eventual husbands.

Results indicate that only a minority of cohabiting women (15 to 20 percent) were involved in multiple cohabitations. Also, serial cohabitations were overrepresented among economically disadvantaged groups, especially those with low income and education.

"Understanding the myriad motivations of cohabiters may be more important than ever, especially if cyclical serial cohabiting couples with children have increased among recent cohorts as a percentage of all cohabitations," Lichter notes.

Source: Wiley

Explore further: Study investigates conflict of interest in biomedical research proposals

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Landless Brazilians in GM eucalyptus protest

2 hours ago

Members of a landless peasant group, some wielding sticks or knives, attacked a cellulose factory in a violent protest against its use of genetically engineered eucalyptus plants, video released by organizers ...

Is the tasty blue crab's natural range creeping north?

5 hours ago

David Johnson was standing in a salt marsh tidal creek north of Boston, Mass., when he scooped up a blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, 80 miles north of its native range. The northern migration of this commer ...

Recommended for you

Thomas Edison's 'lost' idea: A device to hear the dead

Mar 05, 2015

One of Thomas Edison's little-known ambitions was to build a device to hear the voices of the dead, according to a nearly lost chapter of the inventor's memoirs which is being republished in France this week.

Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

Feb 27, 2015

A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide – nearly a quarter of the global population – are forced to pay bribes to gain access to everyday public services, according to a new book by academics at the Universities of Birmingham ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Mauricio
not rated yet Nov 06, 2008
Hymens have a function.... that is why people who marry their school mates, stay married more likely than those who are "free" and "enjoy" life at fullest... I am in the second case, unfortunately, but I know that I am in the wrong track in regards to married life.
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (1) Nov 06, 2008
Hymens have a function....


Yes, it is called "covenant" and a "covenant" is permanent.

If a person cannot be trusted with a little, why should anyone expect them to be trusted with a lot?

"Enjoy life to its fullest" is a PC phrase for "live like the devil and have no conscience about it".

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.