APS announces Physics, a new, free, online publication

Sep 19, 2008

Finding the best in physics now becomes easier with the formal launch of Physics, http://physics.aps.org/ a new, free, online publication from the American Physical Society. Physics will highlight and provide commentary on selected papers from among the extensive publications of Physical Review Letters and the Physical Review series. Optional weekly email updates will keep readers apprised of important new articles as they appear.

The authoritative but brief reports in Physics on exciting and important new research will help keep researchers abreast of developments within and outside of their own fields and can catalyze interdisciplinary work. With the combined output of the APS peer-reviewed publications at about 18,000 papers a year, there is clearly a need to pull the truly exceptional papers out from among the merely excellent works, and place them in context.

"Our readers don't want to miss significant developments in other subfields of physics," says Gene Sprouse, APS Editor in Chief, "and our authors need and deserve more attention for their best papers." Physics aims to meet those needs by means of three features, all with original content. "Viewpoints" discuss and explain a particular paper's findings in a manner accessible to all physicists, especially to those outside its subspecialty. "Trends" are longer pieces that cover a recent body of work in a specific field, but also look ahead to the challenges and questions that fascinate that field's top researchers. "Synopses" are staff-written summaries of papers that merit wider attention among physicists in all fields.

"The selection process will be rigorous but not rigid," says David Voss, Physics' Editor. "We'll highlight papers that change the rules of the game, afford cross-disciplinary potential, or report a substantial breakthrough in a particular field." Feedback and suggestions by email to physics_at_aps.org are welcome.

In its beta test phase since July, Physics has featured 18 Viewpoints, 2 Trends, and over 25 Synopses. Future issues will introduce additional features and new ways for Physics to spotlight exceptional research.

Source: American Physical Society

Explore further: The unifying framework of symmetry reveals properties of a broad range of physical systems

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E_L_Earnhardt
1 / 5 (1) Sep 21, 2008
I strongly suggest support for opening a "Physics
Against Cancer Center" and soliciting grants and gifts for same! The Chemists have utterly failed after 100 years of seeking the cure that would bring in billions from pharmaceutical companies!