Bleeding-heart jetsetters spell bad news for climate

Sep 01, 2008

The emergence of a new generation of ‘bleeding-heart jetsetters’ has disturbing implications for the UK’s spiralling emissions from air travel, according to new research by the University of Exeter. The results of the research by the School of Geography, Archaeology and Earth Resources and University of Exeter Business School were presented by Dr Stewart Barr at the Royal Geographical Society with IBG Annual Conference.

According to a survey of over 200 people, along with focus groups and in-depth interviews, even the most committed environmentalists – identified by green trademarks such as shopping ethically, installing water and energy saving appliances and recycling – would not be prepared to accept extra ‘green taxes’ and are deeply sceptical of the carbon offsetting schemes designed to mitigate them.

Indeed, of those questioned, 59% were against the introduction of further taxes on air travel, whilst just 15% of those questioned had used carbon offsetting. The largest group identified from the survey, the ‘eco-hypocrites’ – those who operate green households yet also choose to fly – justified their jaunts by suggesting that recycling, using energy saving lightbulbs and buying ethically-sourced groceries were sufficient to ‘trade off’ the impact of their holidays abroad.

Even the most ‘eco-conscious’ were determined to keep flying regardless of environmental cost, believing that taxes and offsetting would have little impact on the reducing emissions from flying, the researchers found.

Dr Stewart Barr of the University of Exeter’s School of Geography, Archaeology and Earth Resources said: “Ironically, our research shows that even the most bleeding-heart jetsetters aren’t willing to reduce their flying habits significantly, despite their supposedly impeccable green credentials. Low-cost air travel has become embedded into our culture here in the UK, so trying to change everyone’s behaviour, when even the most eco-conscious amongst us have very little trust in the ability of either green taxes or carbon offsetting to reduce the impact of flying, will be a formidable challenge.”

Provided by University of Exeter

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User comments : 5

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TheRogue
2.6 / 5 (5) Sep 01, 2008
Wow! with a headline like that, the entire article becomes instantly slanted. And it is. "Bleeding heart" has become such a pejorative term I wonder why the editors didn't catch it. If this is supposedly a "scientific" list, don't we deserve better than such tacky editorializing by headline writers?
dirk_bruere
3.4 / 5 (5) Sep 01, 2008
The reason is simple: we do not believe "environmental taxes" will actually be used to benefit the environment. In fact, they are just another excuse for raising tax in general ie those politicians are lying b*astards
GrayMouser
5 / 5 (3) Sep 01, 2008
The sordid truth comes out.
Sophos
4.3 / 5 (3) Sep 02, 2008
Wow! with a headline like that, the entire article becomes instantly slanted.


Wow there is actually a anti-liberal bias media out there somewhere!! Rogue welcome to the conservative view of the world.
MikeB
3.7 / 5 (3) Sep 02, 2008
I suppose even "bleeding hearts" realize that the UN and our own governments are not be trusted. They also, apparently, are beginning to see the truth. CO2 emissions are not harming the Earth. The scaremongering is having the opposite effect.

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