Colo. tap water violates health standards

Apr 28, 2008

Tap water being consumed in 37 small Colorado communities has been found to have violated state health standards, state records show.

State records show the tap water supply, which is used by 30,000 Colorado residents, had levels of naturally occurring uranium and radium radionuclides higher than current standards, The Denver Post reported Sunday.

Environmental Protection Agency official Jack Rycheky said implementing a better water treatment system in those affected communities would likely cost millions of dollars.

"When you've got a couple million customers tied in, you can afford treatment," the regional drinking water program chief said. "But if you have 100 people … treatment is very expensive."

The new standards for radium in tap water are anything more than 5 picocuries of radiation per liter, while 30 micrograms of uranium in a liter of water is the maximum level.

Higher levels of both radioactive elements would place Colorado residents at a higher risk for both kidney damage and cancer, the Post said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Study shows no lead pollution in oilsands region

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

MasterCard, Zwipe announce fingerprint-sensor card

2 hours ago

On Friday, MasterCard and Oslo, Norway-based Zwipe announced the launch of a contactless payment card featuring an integrated fingerprint sensor. Say goodbye to PINs. This card, they said, is the world's ...

Plastic nanoparticles also harm freshwater organisms

4 hours ago

Organisms can be negatively affected by plastic nanoparticles, not just in the seas and oceans but in freshwater bodies too. These particles slow the growth of algae, cause deformities in water fleas and impede communication ...

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

4 hours ago

Throw a rock through a window made of silica glass, and the brittle, insulating oxide pane shatters. But whack a golf ball with a club made of metallic glass—a resilient conductor that looks like metal—and the glass not ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

12 hours ago

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

UN biodiversity meet commits to double funding

13 hours ago

A UN conference on preserving the earth's dwindling resources wrapped up Friday with governments making a firm commitment to double biodiversity aid to developing countries by 2015.

Recommended for you

Study shows no lead pollution in oilsands region

9 hours ago

New research from a world-renowned soil and water expert at the University of Alberta reveals that there's no atmospheric lead pollution in Alberta's oilsands region—a finding that contradicts current scientific ...

User comments : 0