Beekeepers call for pesticide ban

Apr 10, 2008

Environmentalists have joined Italian beekeepers in calling for a ban on the use of neonicotinoids after more than 40,000 bees died in recent months.

The Italian news agency ANSA reported 200 protesters rallied Tuesday outside the agriculture ministry, waving banners that highlighted their concern about the relationship between the nicotine-based seed treatments and bee colony die-offs.

The National Union of Italian Beekeepers said some studies have suggested the insecticide leads bees to stop feeding larvae and hurts their navigational abilities. It is estimated about 200,000 beehives disappeared in Italy last year, ANSA said.

The agricultural union Coldiretti said a third of all farm produce depends on insect pollination, mostly carried out by bees.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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bfreewithrp
4 / 5 (1) Apr 14, 2008
Honey bees, learn what could happen if they disappeared.
http://www.quazen...ry.22165
The Honey Bee Mystery
One even greater peril...
Come springtime depending on what part of the U.S. you happen to live, local town officials ready their mosquito spray equipment for another round with their never ending battle with the EEE carriers. Each attempt to eradicate its possible effects on the local populace is usually met with an uphill battle.
http://www.quazen...l.105751
Wetlands: Key to EEE Mosquito Control
ChiRaven
not rated yet Jun 24, 2008
How to keep unwanted pests in check without devastating the vital work of the bees and other insects that provide pollination is a tough nut to crack. But it is vital.