NASA starts new science Web site

Apr 10, 2008

The U.S. space agency announced the start of a new Web site designed to provide information about its scientific endeavors and achievements.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's science mission directorate said the site will provide in-depth coverage of NASA's past, present and future science missions, along with features that include:

-- Iteractive tables and searches for Earth, heliophysics, planetary and astrophysics missions.

-- Insight into dark matter and dark energy, planets around other stars, climate change, Mars and space weather.

-- Resources for researchers, including links to upcoming science solicitations and opportunities.

-- Expanded "For Educators" and "For Kids" pages to provide access to a broader range of resources for learning the science behind NASA missions.

The new Web page is available at
nasascience.nasa.gov

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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