Camera can see through clothing

Mar 11, 2008

Developers of a specialized camera that can help police detect weapons and drugs under clothing say they will show it off in England this week.

The camera, which can see through clothing at distances of up to 80 feet, could be used by authorities in such places as railway stations and airports, The Sunday Times of London reported.

The newspaper reported that while the T5000 system can detect objects under clothing, it does not show anatomical details. It works by detecting and measuring terahertz waves, or T-waves for short.

Because each object emits different wavelengths, the camera can distinguish, for example, between sugar and cocaine, the newspaper reported.

The technology, originally designed for use in spacecraft to see through clouds of cosmic dust, was developed by ThruVision, an English company.

"Acts of terrorism have shaken the world in recent years and security precautions have been tightened globally. The T5000 dramatically extends the range over which we can scan people," said ThruVision Chief Executive Clive Beattie.

The camera will be showcased at the Home Office scientific development branch's annual exhibition at an airbase in Buckinghamshire, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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