Electronic pen first to upload handwriting from plain paper

Mar 03, 2008 by Lisa Zyga weblog
Mobile Digital Scribe

The Mobile Digital Scribe by IOGEAR is the first electronic pen that can capture handwriting and drawings from any surface, which can later be uploaded to a computer as text and JPEG files. Unlike other electronic pen-to-PC systems, the Mobile Digital Scribe doesn´t require a special digital notepad, but any size paper up to letter size will work.

The system has two components: a pen and a receiver. The pen uses ordinary ink, and its regular size and weight makes writing feel natural. But the pen also contains an infrared sensor, which captures hand movements while writing. The receiver is clipped to the notepad or paper, and receives data from the pen through the pen´s ultrasonic transmitter. The receiver can store up to 50 pages of writing and pictures.

The Mobile Digital Scribe comes with a USB cable which is used to connect the receiver to a PC. IOGEAR´s handwriting recognition software translates notes into text and sketches into JPEGs, which can be saved and edited. Text can be shared via JPEG format through e-mail or instant messaging.

The Mobile Digital Scribe can also be connected to a PC while the user is writing, and handwritten text and drawings will be displayed automatically on the computer screen.

The technology can identify 12 languages, including Italian, Swedish, Chinese, and Russian. IOGEAR plans to target the system at students as well as legal and medical professionals. Instead of carrying laptops to class and meetings, individuals can use regular paper with the electronic pen and receiver, and upload their notes at home.

The Mobile Digital Scribe is available for $130, and comes with IOGEAR´s limited one-year warranty.

via: www.iogear.com

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User comments : 2

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Wicked
not rated yet Mar 04, 2008
You cut down on electricity, but with a $130 price tag, you're gonna run out of ink before you save on money.
gopher65
not rated yet Mar 04, 2008
Errrm, that's what 75cent refills are for Wicked.

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