Commercial rocket schedule delayed

Mar 02, 2008

The first launch in the NASA Commercial Orbital Transportation Service has been postponed until June 2009.

SpaceX announced the delay of the Falcon 9 launch Friday, saying it was putting off the launch for nine months, Florida Today reported.

Roger Gilbertson, a spokesman for the company, said the postponement was at SpaceX's request. But he said there are no technical glitches involved.

The space shuttle program closes down in 2010. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has provided $500 million to help private companies develop vehicles that can reach the International Space Station.

SpaceX has been authorized to receive $278 million for three Falcon 9 launches, the last in March 2010.

A NASA spokeswoman said the agency has approved the new schedule.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

DARPA's experimental space plane XS-1 starts development

Jul 16, 2014

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is looking to develop a fully-reusable unmanned spaceplane, and they are now ready to start working their proposed Experimental Spaceplane (XS-1). The ...

NASA mission to reap bonanza of earth-sized planets

Jul 15, 2014

Set to launch in 2017, NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will monitor more than half a million stars over its two-year mission, with a focus on the smallest, brightest stellar objects.

Recommended for you

Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

5 hours ago

For the first time, Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, b ...

How do we terraform Venus?

5 hours ago

It might be possible to terraform Venus some day, when our technology gets good enough. The challenges for Venus are totally different than for Mars. How will we need to fix Venus?

Biomarkers of the deep

7 hours ago

Tucked away in the southwest corner of Spain is a unique geological site that has fascinated astrobiologists for decades. The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) in Spain's Río Tinto area is the largest known deposit ...

User comments : 0