NASA adds technologies Web feature

Feb 26, 2008

The U.S. space agency has added an interactive program to its Web site, allowing users to discover some of the space technologies that now impact daily life.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Deputy Administrator Shana Dale unveiled "NASA at Home" and "NASA City" Tuesday in Denver during the 3rd Space Exploration Conference.

Dale said the interactive site takes users on an illustrated tour of the commercial technologies and products in their homes and cities that trace their origins to NASA's space and aeronautics research and development. NASA has documented more than 1,500 examples of how its technologies have been used for bettering life on Earth.

Visitors can scroll over technologies grouped by themes such as the home, airport, grocery store, sports arena, hospital, public safety and manufacturing.

After entering an area, users can read a short description of the technology to learn more about products such as temperature-regulated clothing developed from materials used in astronauts' suits and gloves, wireless headset telephone technology pioneered to transmit the first words from the moon and remote-controlled ovens based on International Space Station technology.

The new Web features are available at
www.nasa.gov/multimedia/mmgallery/index.html.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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