Will the vAMP replace the CD?

Jan 18, 2008 by Lisa Zyga weblog
The vAMP MP3 player by MediaStreet.

While some people might argue that the CD has already been replaced by the MP3, music stores want to think otherwise. The digital device manufacturer MediaStreet has recently announced a product that it hopes will replace the CD and get music fans back in stores.

The new device, called the vAMP (virtual album MP3 player), is like a cross between a CD and MP3. Technically, it´s an MP3 player, but it comes pre-loaded with a particular album, and you buy it in stores. The vAMP doesn´t have a screen, but it has a front sticker containing album art and a back sticker containing the track listing and liner notes. MediaStreet claims that it´s the smallest (0.7 ounces) and thinnest (3 mm) fully functional MP3 player.

The vAMP has 1 GB of space, so consumers can add additional songs to the device, as well as transfer the vAMP´s pre-loaded songs to a computer. Consumers will also have access to Beyond.FM and MyDigitialContent.com to download songs.

The vAMP has a suggested retail price of $27.99 each (or you can buy a blank vAMP for $19.99). It may be about the cheapest MP3 player you can get, but it´s still quite a bit pricier than a single CD or downloading individual songs.

Nevertheless, MediaStreet and the music stores are hoping that the vAMP and a compelling marketing campaign will lure music fans back into stores. Certainly, the device provides a more tangible collectible item than single MP3s. But whether people who already own iPods will be interested remains to be seen.

via: ChipChick

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User comments : 13

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NeilFarbstein
1 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2008
how come the i pod is so expensive?
BigMike
3 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2008
I DONT THINK THIS WILL GO ANYWHERE.
TOO LIMITED.
COCO
1 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2008
tech pushes don't make anymore
mattytheory
3 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2008
how does it lure music fans back into stores? the article says that it has a 1GB capacity and that users can transfer files back and forth between their computer and this device. people are still going to download the mp3s (or buy them online, but only because they dont know how to download them) instead of buying them in the store.

the only difference is that this only costs $30, not $150.
Zen
2 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2008
So it's just an mp3 with songs...at least you can change the songs on it. You would only need to buy one, then buy the CD verson of the other albums you want so you can rip the tracks and put them on your vAMP. No one is going to want hundreds of these stupid mp3 players laying around.
MrFred
2 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2008
Hmmm, it doesn't take a marketing annalist to see that this won't go very far.
Theran
4 / 5 (1) Jan 19, 2008
This has got to be the most wasteful product of all time!
KB6
3 / 5 (1) Jan 19, 2008
And the most popular tune:
The Sound of Music Stores Whistling Past the Graveyard
Ashibayai
3 / 5 (1) Jan 19, 2008
So...it's basically like selling music on CD-RW's?...

An MP3 player is an MP3 player. They're just trying to reduce features on them, and sell them like CDs.
nilbud
2 / 5 (1) Jan 21, 2008
Not since the 8-track has such a stupid idea been proposed. Bittorrent has all the music you could ever want for free.
mrlewish
5 / 5 (1) Jan 21, 2008
I see EPIC FAIL written all over this one. I also see this as an attempt by the music industries attempt to throw interference at the problem of internet downloading. There must be ulterior motives in offering this.
JAB
4 / 5 (1) Jan 22, 2008
So...it's basically like selling music on CD-RW's?...

An MP3 player is an MP3 player. They're just trying to reduce features on them, and sell them like CDs.
So...it's basically like selling music on CD-RW's?...

An MP3 player is an MP3 player. They're just trying to reduce features on them, and sell them like CDs.


I agree. I can almost see the logic in thinking that when you can't sell $10-$18 CDs you should have not problem selling $30 albums...
And everyone would be sure to be a repeat customer- I mean, we all need a new one of these for each album right? Wait a minute, there's extra space in these? Now where am i supposed to get the extra MP3s to fill it up? Oh, yes, I'll just DRIVE my car down to a store so I can buy a few MP3s...
Apart from the extra cost of gas, the inconvenience factor, the ridiculously high price, the infinitessimal chance of people buying more than one, the question of batteries/maintenance, breaking into highly saturated/established markets and a few other quibbles I can't see how this won't work. I mean, there is actual album art printed on the thing...

Well, at least this may be a distraction from the intense 'litigate our customers to death' campaign.
DGBEACH
not rated yet Jan 29, 2008
Why would they want to keep the stores??? Lure the people to your no-rent-no-employee website and sell-em MP3s for 10 or 20 cents.

With decisions like this its no wonder why artists are steering away from the labels and doing everything themselves. With today's technology even a child (or a Speares) can make a quality sounding product, with or without talent.
The record industry is suffering from a severe case of denial.

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