'WildCharger' leads wireless power revolution

Nov 30, 2007 by Lisa Zyga weblog
WildCharger

WildCharge Inc.'s new wireless charging pad has recently won several awards and sparked the interest from the electronics, automobile, and furniture industries as one of the first wireless charging devices.

Most recently, the company's product, the 'WildCharger,' won the International Consumer Electronics Show 2008 Best of Innovations Award. The award, given in the Portable Power Category, was presented to the company by the Consumer Electronics Association. Last month, the WildCharger was selected as one of TIME Magazine´s Best Inventions of the Year for 2007.

Currently, the WildCharger charging pad sells for $60 on the company´s Web site. In addition to the pads, adapters for different cell phones and other devices must be purchased, which sell for $30 to $35, depending on if they are bought together with or separate from the pad. The company currently offers adapters for AT&T/Cingular, Verizon, Sprint, Alltel, and T-Mobile Motorola RAZR phones. In the future, they plan to offer adapters for iPod Nanos, Blackberries, and iPhones, as well. The charger is even strong enough to power laptops.

But eventually, WildCharge's President Izhar Matzkevich hopes that leading companies in electronics and other industries will embed the WildCharge technology into their products, which many companies are already planning to do.

WildCharge has been developing the technology since 2001, and claims to be the first and only provider of technology of its kind. When the pad is plugged in to a wall socket, power is transferred from the pad's surface to electrical contacts on a device´s adapter. WildCharge says this power transfer is basically 100% efficient, and doesn´t emit harmful radiation or magnetic fields.

Besides being convenient, WildChargers also offer environmental benefits by eliminating the need for separate devices that require separate wall plugs, since one pad can charge up to five devices simultaneously. The technology also minimizes the number of disposable chargers. Because WildChargers work with any phone that has the embedded technology or appropriate adaptor, consumers who upgrade their phones won't have to purchase new chargers.

More information: www.WildCharge.com

Explore further: Nintendo's trailblazing Game Boy marks 25th anniversary

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Invention loves collaboration at Milan show

Apr 14, 2014

Collaboration drove invention during Milan's annual International Furniture Show and collateral design week events, yielding the promise of homes without mobile phone chargers, and with more ergonomic seating, ...

Honda smart home offers vision for zero carbon living

Mar 26, 2014

Honda and the University of California, Davis, today marked the opening of Honda Smart Home US, showcasing technologies that enable zero net energy living and transportation. The home in UC Davis West Village ...

Hot fire check test of SpaceX first stage engines

Mar 10, 2014

The historic blast off of the first SpaceX rocket equipped with 'landing legs' and also carrying a private Dragon cargo vessel bound for the Space Station is now slated for March 16 following a short and ...

'Oddball science' has proven worth, say biologists

Feb 27, 2014

Scoffing at or cutting funds for basic biological research on unusual animal adaptations from Gila monster venom to snail sex, though politically appealing to some, is short-sighted and only makes it more ...

Graphene can pave the way for Australian manufacturing

Jan 28, 2014

Australian industries have reached a turning point. With old industries on the way out, the Australian manufacturing sector's biggest challenge is to move from a low-cost mass production model to one that expl ...

Recommended for you

Review: With Galaxy S5, Samsung proves less can be more

8 hours ago

Samsung Electronics Co. has produced the most formidable rival yet to the iPhone 5S: the Galaxy S5. The device, released over the weekend, is the fifth edition of the company's successful line of Galaxy S ...

Five features an Amazon phone might offer (Update)

Apr 18, 2014

A report this week in The Wall Street Journal that Amazon is planning to release a smartphone has prompted industry analysts and technology blogs to muse about what the device might offer.

User comments : 9

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

HeRoze
5 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2007
Hmmmm, wonder if things get 'exciting' if, when you place your phone on the WildCharger, you accidently drop a coin or keys on it.
>> Their website answered that question: "Once a metal object is placed on the pad, the pad will gracefully shutdown and restart once the device is removed. The metal object will have no harmful effect on the pad, and the pad has no effect on the metal object"
freemind
not rated yet Nov 30, 2007
I really think it's our future
loboy
4 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2007
"WildChargers also offer environmental benefits by eliminating the need for separate devices that require separate wall plugs..."

Come on! Too many companies are using these green tag lines with no evidence of "environmental benefits".

For example: I have four devices with four chargers, all about the same mass of plastic, iron, and copper. So, would I be reducing the manufacturing footprint for these transformer parts? The "benefits" would come only if every single portable device incorporated this tech. That would mean every manufacturer of portable device transformers would have to move to producing these units.

For example: I could either have four small transformers at 0.5 amp each for four devices, or I could have a single larger transformer at 2 amps for four devices. The amount of copper and iron is relatively the same.

But say I buy this unit and I have one device, that would mean I am essentially purchasing a transformer that is overqualified for the job, and actually increasing the manufacturing footprint.

My math seems correct. Someone please correct if I am wrong.
loboy
not rated yet Nov 30, 2007
Oh, and it's not truly"wireless", the electrical contacts are the wires. It is a lumped element in a circuit.
snwboardn
5 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2007
I agree with loboy on this one... When I can put a "microwave" dish in the corner of my room that will power all of my electronics, without cooking my insides, then I will be impressed
earls
5 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2007
Wow, if this is "leading" the "wireless power" "revolution" then I truly feel bad for consumers.

Congratulations on your new cell phone charger!
dfwrunner
not rated yet Dec 01, 2007
I've had a wireless razar charger from panasonic for about 6 years. It is an inductive charger, no wired connection provisions even.
Rohitasch
not rated yet Dec 06, 2007
"Wireless"! Lol! Its "Platefull"!
Ulg
not rated yet Nov 05, 2008
Old news and meager in scale- perhaps the best application for this principle but Tesla laid the blueprints and demonstrated this type of technology in just about every respect over a hundred years ago.

More news stories

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.