Exxon upgrades lithium car batteries

Nov 29, 2007

U.S. researchers say they've developed a plastic film that will make it easier for automakers to use lithium-ion batteries in electric cars and trucks.

The super-thin plastic sheeting will be unveiled by Exxon Mobil Corp. at a conference this week in Anaheim, Calif., the Houston Chronicle said Wednesday.

The company said the plastic film, developed with Japanese affiliate Tonen Chemical, will make lithium-ion batteries safer, stronger and more reliable. The film squeezes multiple layers of plastic into a single sheet the thickness of a human hair, allowing the batteries to run at higher temperatures and produce more power without overheating.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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