Exxon upgrades lithium car batteries

Nov 29, 2007

U.S. researchers say they've developed a plastic film that will make it easier for automakers to use lithium-ion batteries in electric cars and trucks.

The super-thin plastic sheeting will be unveiled by Exxon Mobil Corp. at a conference this week in Anaheim, Calif., the Houston Chronicle said Wednesday.

The company said the plastic film, developed with Japanese affiliate Tonen Chemical, will make lithium-ion batteries safer, stronger and more reliable. The film squeezes multiple layers of plastic into a single sheet the thickness of a human hair, allowing the batteries to run at higher temperatures and produce more power without overheating.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers use passive UHF RFID tags to detect how people interact with objects

Related Stories

China orders media giant Sina to 'improve censorship'

8 hours ago

China's government has threatened to shut down Sina, one of the country's most popular news websites unless it "improves censorship", state media reported, in a rare public glimpse into controls over the ...

Turkmenistan pledges to curb water use

Apr 05, 2015

The leader of Turkmenistan on Sunday pledged to streamline water use, a huge problem in the isolated desert nation believed to be among the world's top water wasters.

Recommended for you

Intellectual property in 3D printing

Apr 16, 2015

The implications of intellectual property in 3D printing have been outlined in two documents created for the UK government by Bournemouth University's Dinusha Mendis and Davide Secchi, and Phil Reeves of Econolyst Ltd.

World-record electric motor for aircraft

Apr 16, 2015

Siemens researchers have developed a new type of electric motor that, with a weight of just 50 kilograms, delivers a continuous output of about 260 kilowatts – five times more than comparable drive systems. ...

Space open for business, says Electron launch system CEO

Apr 15, 2015

Space, like business, is all about time and money, said Peter Beck, CEO of Rocket Lab, a US company with a New Zealand subsidiary. The problem, he added, is that, in cost and time, space has remained an incredibly ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.