Underground CO2 storage study to begin

Oct 25, 2007

The University of Texas has received a $38 million subcontract to conduct the first U.S. long-term study of underground carbon dioxide storage.

The university's Bureau of Economic Geology said the 10-year project is designed to build public assurance about the use of underground carbon sequestration to reduce atmospheric emissions.

The project is a phase III research program, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy.

The project will focus on the feasibility of injecting large volumes of CO2 at high rates into deep brine reservoirs. Officials said key issues will include estimating the CO2 storage capacity of brine reservoirs, understanding the effects of injection pressure and developing methods for documenting retention of CO2 in the injection zone.

Beginning this fall, the project will inject CO2 at the rate of 1 million tons annually for up to 1.5 years into brine as deep as 10,000 feet below the land surface near the Cranfield Oil Field, about 15 miles east of Natchez, Miss.

Scientists will use experimental equipment to measure the ability of the subsurface to accept and retain CO2.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Antibiotic resistance risk for coastal water users

Related Stories

Study tracks safety of underground CO2 storage

Dec 13, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- In a paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of geoscientists, including Simon Fraser University groundwater expert Dirk Kirste ...

Recommended for you

Drought damage leads to widespread forest death

2 hours ago

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling ...

Good luck and the Chinese reverse global forest loss

2 hours ago

Analysis of 20 years of satellite data has revealed the total amount of vegetation globally has increased by almost 4 billion tonnes of carbon since 2003. This is despite ongoing large-scale deforestation ...

Technology set to revolutionise global aerosol industry

4 hours ago

Technology developed by a specialist research team at the University of Salford looks set to revolutionise the global aerosol industry, following agreements to run commercial trials of the technology by some ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.