Astronaut Ed Lu leaves NASA

Aug 13, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced the resignation of veteran astronaut Ed Lu.

Lu, who flew on two shuttle missions and lived six months aboard the International Space Station as a member of the orbiting laboratory's seventh crew, is leaving NASA to "pursue private interests," officials said.

Lu's NASA tenure included more than six hours of spacewalking. He was the first American to launch as flight engineer of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, as well as the first American to both launch and land on a Soyuz.

Selected as an astronaut in 1994, Lu first flew in May 1997 aboard Atlantis for the STS-84 mission, the sixth shuttle mission to visit the Russian space station Mir. He next flew in 2000 on mission STS-106, also aboard Atlantis, performing a spacewalk during a mission to the International Space Station. He returned to the ISS in 2003 as flight engineer and NASA science officer of Expedition 7, the first two-person resident crew.

Born July 1, 1963, in Springfield, Mass., Lu holds a bachelor of science degree from Cornell University and a doctorate in applied physics from Stanford University.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Start of dwarf planet mission delayed after small mix-up

Related Stories

Image: Claude Nicollier repairing Hubble

Apr 21, 2015

This week marks the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble space telescope. Hubble was designed to be maintained and repaired by astronauts and since its launch in 1990 five Space Shuttle missions made ...

US astronaut launches geography quiz on Twitter

13 hours ago

American astronaut Scott Kelly has launched a geography quiz on Twitter and will post a picture from the International Space Station each week so fans can guess his location.

Recommended for you

Can sound help us detect 'earthquakes' on Venus?

Apr 23, 2015

Detecting an "earthquake" on Venus would seem to be an impossible task. The planet's surface is a hostile zone of crushing pressure and scorching temperatures—about 874 degrees F, hot enough to melt lead—that ...

Titan's atmosphere useful in study of hazy exoplanets

Apr 23, 2015

With more than a thousand confirmed planets outside of our solar system, astronomers are attempting to identify the atmospheres of these distant bodies to determine if they could possibly host life.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.