Astronaut Ed Lu leaves NASA

Aug 13, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced the resignation of veteran astronaut Ed Lu.

Lu, who flew on two shuttle missions and lived six months aboard the International Space Station as a member of the orbiting laboratory's seventh crew, is leaving NASA to "pursue private interests," officials said.

Lu's NASA tenure included more than six hours of spacewalking. He was the first American to launch as flight engineer of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, as well as the first American to both launch and land on a Soyuz.

Selected as an astronaut in 1994, Lu first flew in May 1997 aboard Atlantis for the STS-84 mission, the sixth shuttle mission to visit the Russian space station Mir. He next flew in 2000 on mission STS-106, also aboard Atlantis, performing a spacewalk during a mission to the International Space Station. He returned to the ISS in 2003 as flight engineer and NASA science officer of Expedition 7, the first two-person resident crew.

Born July 1, 1963, in Springfield, Mass., Lu holds a bachelor of science degree from Cornell University and a doctorate in applied physics from Stanford University.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Mercury's magnetic field tells scientists how its interior is different from Earth's

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

End dawns for Europe's space cargo delivery role

Jul 27, 2014

Europe will close an important chapter in its space flight history Tuesday, launching the fifth and final robot ship it had pledged for lifeline deliveries to the International Space Station.

Finding NEEMO

Jul 17, 2014

NEEMO – NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations – trains astronauts for life in space. Living and working in an underwater base is similar to being on a space station. This year, NASA has two NEEMO ...

Training astronauts in uncharted caverns

Jul 14, 2014

ESA trainers and caving specialists recently went underground in Sardinia, Italy to set the scene for space-like astronaut training later this summer.

Recommended for you

Tidal forces gave moon its shape, according to new analysis

4 hours ago

The shape of the moon deviates from a simple sphere in ways that scientists have struggled to explain. A new study by researchers at UC Santa Cruz shows that most of the moon's overall shape can be explained by taking into ...

User comments : 0