Hacker group plans to 'unhood' KKK members

October 31, 2015
Hacker group Anonymous is planning to reveal the identities of up to 1,000 Ku Klux Klan members, the latest twist in an ongoing
Hacker group Anonymous is planning to reveal the identities of up to 1,000 Ku Klux Klan members, the latest twist in an ongoing cyber-war on the white supremacist group

Hacker group Anonymous is planning to reveal the identities of up to 1,000 Ku Klux Klan members, the latest twist in an ongoing cyber-war on the white supremacist group.

In Twitter messages and a YouTube video, the "hacktivist" collective said it had obtained the list of names from the Twitter account of a clan member.

"All will be revealed next month around the one year anniversary of #OpKKK," it tweeted, under the handle @Operation_KKK.

Anonymous took action against the Klan in November last year after members of the group threatened violence against peaceful protesters in Ferguson, Missouri.

The Midwestern town has become a symbol for racial tensions in America since the police shooting of an unarmed 18-year-old black man, Michael Brown, in August 2014.

In a statement earlier this week, Anonymous said it felt justified in "applying transparency" to the KKK.

"You are more than extremists. You are more than a hate group," the statement released online said.

"You operate much more like terrorists and you should be recognized as such. You are terrorists that hide your beneath sheets and infiltrate society on every level.

"The privacy of the Ku Klux Klan no longer exists in cyberspace. You've had blood on your hands for nearly 200 years."

The statement said: "We will release, to the global public, the identities of up to 1,000 Klan members, Ghoul Squad affiliates and other close associates of various factions of the Ku Klux Klan across the United States."

The Ghoul Squad is believed to be an auxiliary organization for KKK supporters.

Anonymous claimed to have taken down a KKK-linked Twitter account in November last year, and released the identities of a number of clan members.

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7 comments

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rderkis
2 / 5 (4) Oct 31, 2015
Two wrongs NEVER make a Right.
It seems to counter this, all the KKK would need to do is add to the published list about 5,000 names of famous NON KKK members. Including the names of plenty non white people.
pntaylor
5 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2015
The KKK cannot add to or delete anything from a list Anonymous already has.
Furthermore, exposing the members of organizations such as the KKK is Very Much a Good thing. Many of these people are in positions of power and need to be removed.
RMQ
5 / 5 (4) Oct 31, 2015
How come is wrong to expose those?

It Is fantastic. Anonymous gained my affection, indeed.
HTK
5 / 5 (3) Oct 31, 2015
Finally hackers doing some good in the world, fighting evil.
AGreatWhopper
1 / 5 (4) Oct 31, 2015
And I'm sure they all use their own names on websites.

rderkis, I'd watch out showing intellectual integrity in public. It's deeply distrusted these days. Everyone is supposed to have a gang affiliation and knee-jerk answers using coded language.
PhyOrgSux
1 / 5 (1) Nov 01, 2015
...but instead of direct disclosure the hacker group first wants to spend a few weeks chatting to the media about their possible future plans, all in the hopes of eliciting some "crazy" reaction from KKK...
Lex Talonis
1 / 5 (1) Nov 01, 2015
I am a gay racist, who wants to join the KKK, and become their pony boy.....

Prank calling the KKK

https://www.youtu...BKDG4pJ8

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