NASA sees Tropical Storm Karina get a boost

August 22, 2014
The TRMM satellite passed directly above the center of Tropical Storm Karina on Aug. 22, 2014 at 0151 UTC and saw moderate (green) rainfall in the center. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Karina get a boost on August 22 in the form of some moderate rainfall and towering thunderstorms in the center of the storm.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed directly above the center of Tropical Storm Karina on August 22, 2014 at 0151 UTC (Aug. 21 at 9:51 p.m. EDT). A that used data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) showed that storms near Karina's center were dropping rain at a rate near 25 mm/1 inch per hour. Where the heaviest was occurring, TRMM spotted a couple of towering thunderstorms as high as 15 km (~9 miles).

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured Tropical Storm Karina, Tropical Storm Lowell and Tropical Storm Marie in an infrared image on Aug. 22 at 5 a.m. EDT. Karina appeared to be in the lead of the triple tropical train of storms moving through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The image showed how much smaller and compact Karina is in comparison to Tropical Storm Lowell.

At 11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Karina's maximum sustained winds had increased to near 70 mph (110 kph), and the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that some fluctuations in intensity are possible before Karina begins to weaken on August 23. The center of Tropical Storm Karina was located near latitude 15.0 north and longitude 135.6 west, about 1,325 miles (2,130 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. Karina is moving to the northeast near 3 mph (6 kph) and is expected to turn to the east-northeast as it continues being affected by nearby Tropical Storm Lowell.

Forecaster Roberts at NHC noted that in two days Karina should be on a weakening trend because the storm will be moving into cooler waters and it will run into stable, dry air.

Explore further: NASA sees fragmented thunderstorm bands wrapped around Tropical Storm Karina

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