Survey: Math, science grads earn top dollar

Jul 08, 2014 by Anne Flaherty

A survey by the Department of Education suggests it may matter less whether your alma mater is public or private than what you study—math and science in particular earning recent graduates the most money.

The looked at the class of 2008 four years after they received their hard-earned bachelor's degrees during one of the nation's worst economic . Overall, college grads reported lower unemployment rates compared to the national average at 6.7 percent. College grads from private four-year schools earned about the same as those from public four-year schools, about $50,000 a year.

But while a paltry 16 percent of students took home degrees in , technology, engineering or math, those who did averaged $65,000 a year compared to $49,500 of graduates of other degrees.

Explore further: Job market mixed for college grads

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Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (2) Jul 08, 2014
HEP-Quant is the way to go to leverage physics-math into major bucks.
EWH
3 / 5 (2) Jul 08, 2014
Corrected for IQ, the earnings of the math and science majors are likely lower than the business / marketing middlebrows. Also, not all sciences have equal practitioners. Social scientists and non-chemist biologists are not as bright as the hard science majors, so lumping them all together causes confusion in the results.
Doug_Huffman
5 / 5 (1) Jul 08, 2014
LOL *The Bell Curve* by Herrnstein and Murray, often controverted, never refuted!