Honey bees sting Texas man about 1,000 times

Jul 24, 2014

(AP)—A North Texas street department worker has been stung about 1,000 times by aggressive bees that also attacked two co-workers who tried to help him.

Wichita Falls officials blamed Thursday's attack on Africanized honey bees.

Spokesman Barry Levy (LEE'-vee) says a swarm attacked a worker mowing grass along culverts near the Weeks Park Tennis Center. He says the man was in good condition at a local hospital.

Levy says two co-workers also were stung when they came to the man's aid. One worker fled into a nearby tennis center, bringing the swarm with him.

One of the co-workers also was hospitalized in good condition, the other was treated and discharged.

The center, a nearby trail and part of a golf course remain closed until personnel confirm the bees are gone.

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User comments : 8

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Jeweller
4 / 5 (4) Jul 24, 2014
What is an Africanized honey bee
Dr_toad
Jul 24, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Jeweller
5 / 5 (5) Jul 24, 2014
Thank You
kochevnik
1.3 / 5 (8) Jul 24, 2014
That's racist
Dr_toad
Jul 24, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
kochevnik
1.7 / 5 (6) Jul 24, 2014
African honeybees have a long, proud history and don't need stereotyping from colony hiveminds or swearing allegiance to the Queen
Sinister1812
5 / 5 (1) Jul 25, 2014
What is an Africanized honey bee


You can always use Google.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (3) Jul 25, 2014
Reading around, some think these critters are poised to jump in to the niche left empty by colony collapse disorder. Thrilling. So far, they can't deal with the more temperate northern climate, but perhaps that will change.
nowhere
2 / 5 (4) Jul 25, 2014
What is an Africanized honey bee


You can always use Google.

That he didn't means I don't have to either.
Sinister1812
5 / 5 (2) Jul 25, 2014
What is an Africanized honey bee


You can always use Google.

That he didn't means I don't have to either.


Dude, it only takes less than a minute.
Dr_toad
Jul 25, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.