Russia to get first private satellite constellation

Jun 18, 2014
A Russian-built Proton rocket with Russian relay satellite Luch-5V and the Kazakh communication satellite KazSat-3 aboard blasts off from a launch pad in the Russian leased Kazakhstan's Baikonur cosmodrome on April 28, 2014

A Russian startup said Wednesday it will launch several satellites in the coming weeks, the country's first private satellite constellation, to offer maritime monitoring services.

Dauria Aerospace will on Thursday launch two satellites, to be followed by another one in July, and begin offering navigation help for and river vessels in cooperation with the Russian transportation ministry.

"It will be the first Russian private satellite constellation," Vitaly Yegorov, spokesman for Dauria Aerospace, told AFP.

The third satellite was completely financed, designed and assembled by private companies, and could provide a much-needed boost for the country's beleaguered state-controlled space industry.

The Russian government is scrambling to overhaul its space programme after setbacks including the loss of several satellites and an unmanned supply ship to the International Space Station, but legislation has so far discouraged private initiatives in the sector.

Established in 2011, Dauria Aerospace is controlled by a Russian entrepreneur and brings together experts with experience in the Russian programme and NASA.

"In the future, we will probably cooperate with foreign companies to exchange data for further research," added Yegorov.

Explore further: Rocket with three-man crew lifts off for space station (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Russia launches six US satellites

Feb 06, 2013

A Russian Soyuz rocket on Wednesday successfully launched six US telecommunications satellites from the Baikonur space centre Moscow leases from the ex-Soviet state of Kazakhstan.

Russia: Cable cut not affecting space station

Nov 14, 2012

A communications cable serving the Russian space agency's mission control was cut by construction workers but the accident has not affected the International Space Station or civilian satellites, the U.S. and Russian spa ...

Recommended for you

The source of the sky's X-ray glow

18 hours ago

In findings that help astrophysicists understand our corner of the galaxy, an international research team has shown that the soft X-ray glow blanketing the sky comes from both inside and outside the solar system.

End dawns for Europe's space cargo delivery role

Jul 27, 2014

Europe will close an important chapter in its space flight history Tuesday, launching the fifth and final robot ship it had pledged for lifeline deliveries to the International Space Station.

Giant crater in Russia's far north sparks mystery

Jul 26, 2014

A vast crater discovered in a remote region of Siberia known to locals as "the end of the world" is causing a sensation in Russia, with a group of scientists being sent to investigate.

NASA Mars spacecraft prepare for close comet flyby

Jul 26, 2014

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

Jul 25, 2014

For the first time, Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, b ...

How do we terraform Venus?

Jul 25, 2014

It might be possible to terraform Venus some day, when our technology gets good enough. The challenges for Venus are totally different than for Mars. How will we need to fix Venus?

User comments : 0