Scientists to drop research drones into hurricanes

May 27, 2014 by Jennifer Kay
In this April 29, 2014 photo, Joe Cione, who studies how storms interact with the ocean at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Research Division in Miami, displays a drone he hopes to use this hurricane season for research. NOAA researchers plan to test five or six drones in the peak of hurricane season that will be transmitting data that could help forecasters understand what makes some storms fizzle while others strengthen into monsters. ( AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

The point where the roiling ocean meets the fury of a hurricane's winds may hold the key to improving storm intensity forecasts—but it's nearly impossible for scientists to see.

That may change this summer, thanks to post-Hurricane Sandy federal funding and a handful of winged drones that can spend hours spiraling in a hurricane's dark places. The drones will be transmitting data that could help forecasters understand what makes some storms fizzle while others strengthen into monsters.

Researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration plan to test five or six in the peak of . The $1.25 million project is among a slew of other NOAA hurricane research funded by last year's Sandy supplemental bill that authorized $60 billion for disaster relief agencies.

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