Flood of dead pigs in China reservoir: report

March 26, 2014

Hundreds of dead pigs are being recovered every month from a Chinese reservoir, partly due to government efforts to stop carcasses making their way onto the dining table, state media said Wednesday.

The revelations about the reservoir in Qionglai, in the southwestern province of Sichuan, are the latest scandal relating to to hit China.

The news comes one week after authorities found 157 dead pigs in a river in Jiangxi province. A year ago China was stunned by the appearance of more than 16,000 dead pigs floating along parts of the Huangpu river which flows through the country's commercial hub Shanghai.

The dead creatures also started to drift along rivers into the Qionglai irrigation reservoir five years ago, the Western China City Daily reported.

Now an average of 500 carcasses are retrieved from it every month, the report said, citing Xu Bangchun, one of the two workers hired by local water resources authorities to deal with the remains.

"I have no time to do other things at home now that my main job every day is to recover dead pigs," said Xu, who also runs a family farm tourism business nearby.

There are more than 300,000 pig farmers along the three rivers that feed the reservoir, the paper said.

Some of them are believed to be dumping the dead animals into the waters, probably at night, it said.

Such carcasses were rare in the reservoir until 2005, when the government tightened controls to prevent meat from dead pigs being sold for food or other purposes such as fish feed, the report said, citing a farmer.

A government-subsidised pig insurance scheme was introduced to encourage farmers to dispose of fallen animals properly, it said, but excludes piglets—which make up most of the floating —because of their vulnerability to disease, the paper said.

Explore further: Dead pigs in China river exceed 13,000

Related Stories

Dead pigs in China river exceed 13,000

March 18, 2013

The number of dead pigs found in a river running through China's commercial hub Shanghai had reached more than 13,000, the government and state media said Monday, as mystery deepened over the hogs' precise origin.

Shanghai river's dead pig total approaches 15,000

March 19, 2013

The number of dead pigs found in a river which runs through Shanghai has reached nearly 15,000, officials and reports said Tuesday, as a newspaper claimed the government was concealing the true tally.

Dead ducks in Chinese river as swine flow eases

March 25, 2013

At least 1000 dead ducks were found floating in a Chinese river, state media reported Monday, after Shanghai said it had almost finished recovering thousands of deceased pigs from its main waterway.

China hit by new flood of dead pigs in river

March 19, 2014

Chinese authorities have found 157 dead pigs in a river, state media said Wednesday, underscoring the country's food safety problems a year after 16,000 carcasses were discovered in Shanghai's main waterway.

Recommended for you

Higher coal use in Asia could increase water stress

April 29, 2016

Coal burning, despite recent signs of having peaked in China and pledges made at the Paris Climate talks in December, remains the primary source of electric power in Asia. In both China and India, it's responsible for the ...

What lies beneath West Antarctica?

April 29, 2016

Three recent publications by early career researchers at three different institutions across the country provide the first look into the biogeochemistry, geophysics and geology of Subglacial Lake Whillans, which lies 800 ...

Scientists reveal origin of Earth's oldest crystals

April 28, 2016

New research suggests that the very oldest pieces of rock on Earth—zircon crystals—are likely to have formed in the craters left by violent asteroid impacts that peppered our nascent planet, rather than via plate tectonics ...

Geochemical detectives use lab mimicry to look back in time

April 28, 2016

New work from a research team led by Carnegie's Anat Shahar contains some unexpected findings about iron chemistry under high-pressure conditions, such as those likely found in the Earth's core, where iron predominates and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.