Philippines allows phone use on planes

January 1, 2014
Aircraft of Philippine's largest budget carrier Cebu pacific (R) and Airphilippines (L), a subsidiary of flag carrier Philippine airlines, are parked at terminal 3 of the international airport in Manila on October 17, 2012

The Philippines' civil aviation authority said Tuesday it would allow passengers to use mobile phones and laptops to make calls and access the Internet during flights.

Civil aviation director general William Hotchkiss said the order covered "transmitting portable electronic devices".

With immediate effect, the move will allow "people on board the aircraft conditional use of laptops, cellular phones, Internet or short-based-messaging service, voice communications and other during flights", he said in a directive.

However, devices should still be turned off pre-flight, when the aircraft is refuelling, and be switched to silent mode.

"The use of MP3s should always be with earphones and not with additional or separate speaker or amplifiers," Hotchkiss added.

The United States and the European Union have also said they will relax restrictions on the use of mobile devices on planes. However there have been concerns that allowing voice calls would cause disturbance to other passengers.

Explore further: What a turn-off: why your phone must be powered down on flights

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Osiris1
not rated yet Jan 01, 2014
Hooray for the Philippines! This will mean that if some criminal tries anything on a plane, there are lots of eyes watching who will THEN be able to give warning to the authorities. It will forever stop the alliance of the aircraft industry and Al Qaeda where the terrorist monsters had for some unknown and probably criminal reason had government and industry cooperation in furnishing them not only defenseless victims due to prior laws, but now muted them as well. Now if these terrorist scum try to take over a plane, they will always worry about 'Flight 93'.

"Let's Roll!", said the heroes of Flight 93 when they led the fight on board that stopped that planeload of potential victims from being an 'Al Qaeda missile'! Every passenger and crewman on that flight that was not a terrorist should be awarded the Congressional Medal of Freedom, and their remains whatever and where ever found should be given a military burial with honors.

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