Montana sanctuary bear that underwent MRI dies

January 28, 2014
This Jan. 16, 2014 file photo provided by Washington State University shows a 3-year-old grizzly bear named "Lucy'' being given an MRI at the Washington State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Pullman, Wash. The grizzly bear that underwent an MRI after suffering seizures at a Montana sanctuary has died. Montana Grizzly Encounter officials say Lucy died late on Jan. 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Washington State University, Henry Moore, Jr.,File)

A 3-year-old grizzly bear that underwent an MRI at Washington State University after suffering seizures at a Montana sanctuary has died.

Montana Grizzly Encounter officials say Lucy died late on Jan. 23.

Staff noticed Lucy wasn't being herself earlier this month, and on Jan. 9 she suffered two . Director Ami Testa said Lucy had become more aggressive and lethargic.

Testa says the Jan. 17 tests at Washington State University indicated Lucy had masses and too much fluid in her brain. But KWYB-TV reports (http://bit.ly/1b0FV2W) the sanctuary was still awaiting results of the exam and when Lucy died.

Lucy was brought to Montana after being orphaned in Alaska.

The sanctuary also is home to Brutus, who starred in the National Geographic Channel's "Expedition Grizzly" with host and sanctuary co-owner Casey Anderson.

Explore further: Washington scientists studying sick grizzly

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