World experiences hottest November in 134 years

Dec 17, 2013
People walk in the rain through Union Square in Manhattan on November 26, 2013 in New York City

The month of November was the hottest since record-keeping began in 1880, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Tuesday.

The finding was based on globally averaged land and surface temperatures last month, NOAA said in a statement.

"The combined over global land and ocean surfaces for November 2013 was record highest for the 134-year period of record," NOAA said.

The average temperature was 0.78 Celsius (1.40 Fahrenheit), above the 20th century average of 12.9 Celsius (55.2 Fahrenheit), NOAA said.

It was also the 37th November in a row with worldwide temperatures above the 20th century average.

In fact, the last 28 years have been warmer than normal, NOAA added.

"The last below-average November global temperature was November 1976 and the last below-average global temperature for any month was February 1985," the agency said.

Many parts of the world had warmer than average temperatures last month, while record warmth was seen in parts of Russia, India and the Pacific Ocean.

There were no parts of the world with record cold temperatures last month, but parts of Australia and North America were cooler than average.

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Maggnus
3.4 / 5 (15) Dec 17, 2013
Yet certain posters here continue their attempts to argue the world is cooling. The continuing willful ignorance, denial and contrarianism is beyond ridiculous!

Now no doubt we are in for another round of whack-a-mole.
The Alchemist
3 / 5 (6) Dec 17, 2013
@Maggnus
Here's where the heat from the other discussion went! :)

Well, not entirely.
brunnegd
2.8 / 5 (11) Dec 17, 2013
I am looking forward to seeing how the deniers at Climate Depot will spin this piece of news, other than sticking their heads further into the sand.
lewando
2.7 / 5 (6) Dec 17, 2013
Surface temperature is an artifact of planetary heat content and heat distribution. Of course everyone knows this--why do I always state the obvious--damn!

Its just that, before we get too excited about surface temperatures, I'd like us to know more about the larger scale reality and mechanisms of our planet's heat content and distribution.

I understand that is not a simple desire. Could take 50 years to get on top of that. I would vote on $ for the research.
Dug
1.3 / 5 (7) Dec 17, 2013
Without denying the impacts of the world combusting 30,000+gallons of petroleum per second 24/7, 365 days/year, we should consider that the error of thermometers 134 yrs. ago were multiples of 0.78C, with few manufacturers, handful of global recording stations, which questions the preciseness of the comparisons then and now. Modern lab grade therms. often have higher error rates between brands than 0.78C. Having had to contend with commercial lab grade thermometer (American made.) and as well reader error over my past 40 years of commercial research, I found the link below to be conservative but informative regarding temperature recording error - and something I never hear discussed by climatologist - on either side of the debate. And no - you can't eliminate the error with high sampling when there are multiple error sources, therm. brand, batch, location and reader error, etc. (http://wattsupwit...eters/).
jyro
2.4 / 5 (13) Dec 17, 2013
Data can be made to do whatever you want.
Dug
1.7 / 5 (6) Dec 17, 2013
Among other things and what may just be coincidental to GHG increases - (http://en.wikiped...iation).
rickybobby
2.6 / 5 (10) Dec 18, 2013
Increased heat retention is caused by the excess amount of concrete and cement everywhere. No Rocket Doctor needed to explain that one. Thats why small towns and cities are always colder than big cities. Not only that if the world is getting hotter and all the ice caps are melting just like fox news reports then why is the ice in the south pole growing ? it grew 23 percent last year?
JRi
2.7 / 5 (3) Dec 18, 2013
November and the 1st half of December have been really nice indeed, at least here in Fennoscandia. No snow or freezing cold temperatures.
runrig
3.8 / 5 (10) Dec 18, 2013
Increased heat retention is caused by the excess amount of concrete and cement everywhere. No Rocket Doctor needed to explain that one. Thats why small towns and cities are always colder than big cities. Not only that if the world is getting hotter and all the ice caps are melting just like fox news reports then why is the ice in the south pole growing ? it grew 23 percent last year?


Due increased ocean freshness, caused by enhanced summer melting of peripheral ice sheets. Fresher water does not sink.
Greater dispersal by winds.
These two things are stabilized in the Arctic due it's "locked-in" geography.
The ice is also around half as thick as the Arctic's.
http://nsidc.org/...nce.html
http://phys.org/n...ice.html

Sea/temps down there aren't cooling.
There are things other than temps that govern sea-ice formation/propagation.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (4) Dec 18, 2013
And no - you can't eliminate the error with high sampling when there are multiple error sources, therm. brand, batch, location and reader error, etc.

Important not to conflate error and bias, though.
Egleton
4 / 5 (8) Dec 18, 2013
We hit 46C yesterday (114.8F). The plants began to denature. (Cook, for the more obtuse.) And we live on the coast. Inland it was hotter.
Esperance, Western Australia.
The Alchemist
3.7 / 5 (6) Dec 18, 2013
@Lewando
Excellent point. To compliment it, you should note there are metrics to this phenomenon:

The Earth's oceans have risen 6cm in the last 30 years, which represents melted ice, which in turn represents energy in the Earth system (6 cm x the ocean's are x heat of fusion), that was not there before.
SamB
1 / 5 (7) Dec 18, 2013
I remember my Professor explaining the significance of human existence. He explained that if the world history was compressed into 1 year then around 1 minute to midnight on Dec 31 civilization began. At 20 seconds til midnight, Christopher Columbus found America.
So the hottest November on (our rather limited) record for the last 5 seconds (approximately 130 years) is somehow significant?
The Alchemist
5 / 5 (4) Dec 21, 2013
SamB,
As significant as it is happening NOW.
ubavontuba
1 / 5 (5) Dec 22, 2013
Sure, it graphs warmer, but is it really a "global" phenomena? It looks to me like the major culprit is an unusaul weather pattern in Northern Asia:

http://www.ncdc.n...1311.gif

And another AGW alarmist preferred data set shows it to only be the third warmest November:

http://www.woodfo...83/trend

But over all, it doesn't change the current trend: http://www.woodfo....9/trend

And December appears to be blowing cold:

http://www.ncdc.n...egion=nh

and:

http://igloo.atmo...;sy=2013
ubavontuba
1 / 5 (5) Dec 22, 2013
Repost (links repaired):

World experiences hottest November in 134 years
Sure, it graphs warmer, but is it really a "global" phenomena? It looks to me like the major culprit is an unusual weather pattern in Northern Asia:

http://www.ncdc.n...1311.gif

And another AGW alarmist preferred data set shows it to only be the third warmest November:

http://www.woodfo...83/trend

But over all, it doesn't change the current trend:

http://www.woodfo....9/trend

And December appears to be blowing cold:

http://www.ncdc.n...egion=nh

and:

http://igloo.atmo...;sy=2013

Guy_Underbridge
5 / 5 (3) Dec 22, 2013
I remember my Professor explaining the significance of human existence. He explained that if the world history was compressed into 1 year then around 1 minute to midnight on Dec 31 civilization began. At 20 seconds til midnight, Christopher Columbus found America.
So.... What happens at midnight?
rickybobby
1 / 5 (2) Dec 22, 2013
Increased heat retention is caused by the excess amount of concrete and cement everywhere. No Rocket Doctor needed to explain that one. Thats why small towns and cities are always colder than big cities. Not only that if the world is getting hotter and all the ice caps are melting just like fox news reports then why is the ice in the south pole growing ? it grew 23 percent last year?


Due increased ocean freshness, caused by enhanced summer melting of peripheral ice sheets. Fresher water does not sink.
Greater dispersal by winds.
These two things are stabilized in the Arctic due it's "locked-in" geography.
The ice is also around half as thick as the Arctic's.
http://nsidc.org/...nce.html

Sea/temps down there aren't cooling.
There are things other than temps that govern sea-ice formation/propagation.


growing glaciers thanks to global warming ?

http://www.iceage...iers.htm

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