Video: Earth's wandering magnetic field

November 26, 2013

Earth's magnetic field is continuously changing.

Magnetic north wanders, and every few hundred thousand years the polarity gradually flips, so that a compass would point south instead of north.

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Explore further: Lava flows reveal clues to magnetic field reversals

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