Countdown to the galactic census: Europe's billion-star surveyor is ready for launch

Nov 28, 2013
Countdown to the galactic census: Europe's billion-star surveyor is ready for launch
Artist’s impression of Gaia Credit: European Space Agency

On 20 December 2013, Europe's billion-star surveyor is due to be launched into space where it will embark on its mission to create a highly accurate 3D map of our galaxy.

By repeatedly observing a billion with its billion-pixel video camera, the Gaia mission will allow astronomers to determine the origin and evolution of our galaxy while also testing gravity, mapping our inner solar system, and uncovering tens of thousands of previously unseen objects, including asteroids in our , planets around , and supernovae in other galaxies.

The Astrophysics Group in the University of Bristol's School of Physics has received a grant from the UK Space Agency to further develop the data-handling software authored by Dr Mark Taylor to access the data from the Gaia mission.

Gaia will make a comprehensive survey of the positions and motions of thousands of millions of stars across the Galaxy. This is expected to reveal stellar streams indicating how it was assembled, and chemical signatures showing how the stellar populations have changed over its entire history.

Gaia will map the stars from an orbit around the Sun, near a location some 1.5 million km beyond Earth's orbit known as the L2 Lagrangian point. The spacecraft will spin slowly, sweeping its two telescopes across the entire sky and focusing their light simultaneously onto a single digital camera, the largest ever flown in space.

Gaia data will be processed and analysed ready for release to the scientific community and public at six data centres, including one in the UK, operating software developed and tested by a consortium of 400 people across Europe, including some 50 people at six Institutes in the UK (Cambridge, UCL-MSSL, Leicester, Edinburgh, The Open University, STFC RAL Space and Bristol).

Professor Gerry Gilmore, from the University of Cambridge and UK Principal Investigator for Gaia, said: "Gaia will be a revolution in our knowledge of the local Universe. For the first time we will have a fair sample of what is out there, where it is, how it is moving, how unseen (dark) matter is distributed, where and when stars formed and where and when the chemical elements of which we are made were created."

Explore further: Europe's billion-star surveyor set for launch

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Gaia mapping the stars of the Milky Way

Jun 28, 2013

ESA's billion-star surveyor, Gaia, has completed final preparations in Europe and is ready to depart for its launch site in French Guiana, set to embark on a five-year mission to map the stars with unprecedented ...

Europe's billion-star surveyor set for launch

Nov 27, 2013

By repeatedly observing a billion stars, with its billion-pixel video camera, the Gaia mission will allow astronomers to determine the origin and evolution of our galaxy whilst also testing gravity, mapping ...

Unfolding Gaia

Jun 25, 2013

(Phys.org) —Gaia, ESA's billion-star surveyor, will be launched into space towards the end of this year. In the meantime, ESA Space Science has launched a new 'minisite' focused on the Gaia mission.

Gaia launch postponement update

Oct 24, 2013

Yesterday, the decision was taken to postpone the launch of ESA's Gaia mission after a technical issue was identified in another satellite already in orbit.

Video: Guide to our Galaxy

Nov 22, 2013

This virtual journey shows the different components that make up our home galaxy, the Milky Way, which contains about a hundred billion stars.

Recommended for you

Internet moguls Musk, Bezos shake up US space race

22 hours ago

The space race to end America's reliance on Russia escalated this week with a multibillion dollar NASA award for SpaceX's Elon Musk and an unexpected joint venture for Blue Origin's Jeff Bezos.

Winter in the southern uplands of Mars

Sep 19, 2014

Over billions of years, the southern uplands of Mars have been pockmarked by numerous impact features, which are often so closely packed that they overlap. One such feature is Hooke crater, shown in this ...

Five facts about NASA's ISS-RapidScat

Sep 19, 2014

NASA's ISS-RapidScat mission will observe ocean wind speed and direction over most of the globe, bringing a new eye on tropical storms, hurricanes and typhoons. Here are five fast facts about the mission.

User comments : 0