Contactless payment cards: Research highlights security concerns

Nov 01, 2013

(Phys.org) —Warnings about the use of contactless payment cards and Near Field Communication (NFC) capable devices are raised in a study led by a team of researchers at the University of Surrey.

The team from the University's Computing Department successfully received a contactless transmission from distances of 45-80cm using inconspicuous equipment, highlighting security concerns to personal data.

NFC technology is in use on more recent mobile phones and on contactless debit/credit cards issued by UK banks.

The team used portable, inexpensive and easily concealable equipment including a pocket-sized cylindrical antenna, a backpack, and a shopping trolley, none of which would raise suspicion if used in a supermarket queue or in a crowded place.

Using this equipment, the team showed how reliably eavesdropping could be carried out at various distances, with good reception possible even at 45cm when the minimum magnetic field strength required by the standard is in use.

The implications for consumers are significant. Dr Johann Briffa, Computing Lecturer, comments: "The results we found have an impact on how much we can rely on physical proximity as a 'security feature' of NFC devices.

"Designers of applications using NFC need to consider privacy because the intended short range of the channel is no defence against a determined eavesdropper."

Eleanor Gendle, IET Managing Editor at The Journal of Engineering, said: "With banks routinely issuing contactless to customers, there is a need to raise awareness of the potential security threats. It will be interesting to see further research in this area and ascertain the implications for users of contactless technology with regards to theft, fraud and liability."

According to Paul Krause, Professor of Software Engineering at the University of Surrey, "Open access is vitally important in order to ensure that the results of publicly funded research are made available to all. It is particularly important for the stimulation of innovation in engineering where new enterprises may not have the financial resources to pay for a range of journal subscriptions. The IET has taken a very significant initiative in establishing a high quality journal that covers all aspects of engineering in one resource."

Explore further: Scientists trial system to improve safety at sea

Related Stories

NXP propels NFC technology into 4G age

Feb 28, 2012

Today at Mobile World Congress NXP Semiconductors announced its newest flagship NFC solution, the PN547. Following on from the overwhelming success of the PN544, by far the industry’s most widely adopted Mobile Transactions ...

Security card with a one-time password and LED display

Mar 06, 2013

Infineon Technologies AG and Bundesdruckerei GmbH have developed a new security smart card with an LED display and a one-time password. This new technology is centred around a security chip in the card which ...

Recommended for you

Scientists trial system to improve safety at sea

Jan 30, 2015

A space scientist at the University of Leicester, in collaboration with the New Zealand Defence Technology Agency and DMC International Imaging, has been trialling a concept for using satellite imagery to ...

Skin device uses motion to power electronics

Jan 29, 2015

Can a skin patch power wearables? Skin-based generators have become an area of focus among researchers working on how to scavenge muscle motion whereby skin becomes a charge-collector. A detailed report in ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.