Computer-operated car transports Pa. congressman

September 4, 2013 by Kevin Begos

A computer-operated car has taken a Pennsylvania congressman for a ride.

Rep. Bill Shuster, a Republican from Altoona, made a 33-mile trip from Cranberry Township to Pittsburgh International Airport at about 11 a.m. Wednesday in a self-driven car designed by Carnegie Mellon University. Shuster is the chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and he was accompanied by Barry Schoch, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

The Cadillac SRX was driven along local roads and highways by a computer that uses inputs from radars, laser rangefinders, and . The car reached speeds of 65 mph, and a Carnegie Mellon engineer was in the driver's seat as a .

A camera recorded the trip and streaming video is available online.

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