Wall Street Journal's Chinese version blocked in China

Aug 05, 2013
The headquarters of The Wall Street Journal on April 26, 2010 in New York City. Access to the Wall Street Journal's Chinese-language edition has been cut off in China, where official censors routinely delete online content deemed sensitive but less often block entire websites.

Access to the Wall Street Journal's Chinese-language edition has been cut off in China, where official censors routinely delete online content deemed sensitive but less often block entire websites.

Only the local version of the US newspaper, and not the English-language website, was unavailable. It was unclear why this occurred or whether it was intentional.

The Journal's Chinese-language site has had certain articles blocked since it was launched in 2002, but rarely the whole site.

The ruling Communist Party—highly sensitive to social unrest that might challenge its authority—tightly controls the Internet and news media.

It employs a so-called Great Firewall to filter content from abroad, and a huge staff rapidly to delete offending articles and microblog posts. The popular sites Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are inaccessible.

Authorities also control domestic news outlets to varying degrees and issue directives on coverage.

They blocked the websites of the US media outfits Bloomberg and The New York Times last year after exposes revealed the huge fortunes amassed by relatives of President Xi Jinping and of former premier Wen Jiabao.

A spokesperson for the Journal could not immediately be reached for comment.

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User comments : 2

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alfie_null
not rated yet Aug 05, 2013
I've sometimes wondered how this site (physorg) is treated by the Great Firewall.

If I were a business in China that had international dealings, I would certainly have workarounds in place to remediate the communication disruption the Great Firewall represents. Which leaves me wondering if this action is anything other than symbolic. Maybe a signal to the Journal that it's doing something news-worthy, though.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Aug 05, 2013
I've sometimes wondered how this site (physorg) is treated by the Great Firewall.

You can test it directly (if that site does what it says it does)
http://www.blockedinchina.net

According to that site physorg (at least the main page) is accessible everywhere.

I would certainly have workarounds in place to remediate the communication disruption the Great Firewall represents.

You probably wouldn't (not for general surfing). That sort of thing does tend to get you in serious trouble in China. Companies certainly should ensure an encrypted/secured channel of communication with their other holdings worldwide. But you don't have a right to privacy (i.e. if the police want they can just search your home/business whenever they feel like and confiscate whatever they feel like)