NASA satellite sees Pewa become a typhoon

Aug 19, 2013
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Pewa on Aug. 19 at 01:05 UTC after it strengthened into a typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The image shows that Pewa developed a small eye. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical cyclone known as Pewa after it strengthened into a typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The Aqua satellite image revealed that Pewa had developed a small eye.

On Sunday, Aug. 18, Pewa was a tropical storm when it crossed the International Date Line and moved from the Central Pacific to the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Pewa now falls under the forecast authority of the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

On Aug. 18, data showed that thunderstorm development and convection had slightly weakened, but the system remained well-organized. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC, expected the slight weakening to quickly reverse itself as conditions around the storm improved. The JTWC forecast that Pewa would become a typhoon on Aug. 19, and it did.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Pewa on Aug. 19 at 01:05 UTC shortly after it strengthened into a typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument image showed that Pewa developed a small eye surrounded by strong thunderstorms.

On Monday, Aug. 19 at 0900 GMT/5 a.m. EDT, Typhoon Pewa had near 65 knots/75 mph/120 kph. It was centered near 13.9 north and 177.9 east, about 726 nautical miles east-southeast of Wake Island. Pewa was moving to the northwest at 8 knots/9.2 mph/15 kph.

Pewa is expected to continue to intensify as it moves northwest. The JTWC expects Pewa to pass far to the northeast of Wake Island on Aug. 21 and 22.

Explore further: New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinction

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Improving forecasts for rain-on-snow flooding

18 hours ago

Many of the worst West Coast winter floods pack a double punch. Heavy rains and melting snow wash down the mountains together to breach riverbanks, wash out roads and flood buildings.

The Greenland Ice Sheet: Now in HD

19 hours ago

The Greenland Ice Sheet is ready for its close-up. The highest-resolution satellite images ever taken of that region are making their debut. And while each individual pixel represents only one moment in time, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.