Toshiba launches 13 Megapixel, 1.12um, CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction

July 5, 2013
Toshiba launches 13 Megapixel, 1.12µm, CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction

Toshiba Corp. today announced the launch of "T4K37", a 1.12µm, 13 Megapixel BSI CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction (CNR). Mass production starts today.

The integrated CNR circuit makes it possible for the product, fabricated with the industry's smallest class 1.12µm pixel process, to achieve the same signal-to-noise ratio as equivalent products fabricated with 1.4µm pixel process.

The T4K37 also incorporates a high dynamic range (HDR) function that faithfully reproduces dark and bright areas in high contrast images. The product's high frame rate of 30 fps at full resolution reduces delays in imaging, resulting in less shutter lag, and allows continuous shooting.

Explore further: Sony develops new 'RGBW coding' and 'HDR movie' functions

More information: www.semicon.toshiba.co.jp/eng/product/new_products/sensor/1300033_37652.html

Related Stories

Sony develops new 'RGBW coding' and 'HDR movie' functions

January 24, 2012

Sony Corporation today announced the development of two CMOS image sensor models designed for use in smartphones and other devices. They are equipped with Sony's unique “RGBW Coding” function which allows images ...

Toshiba launches highly sensitive 20MP BSI CMOS image sensor

December 27, 2012

Toshiba Corporation today announced that it will launch a new 20-megapixel (MP) CMOS image sensor, the TCM5115CL, as the latest addition to its sensor line-up for digital still cameras. TCM5115CL offers the industry's highest ...

Recommended for you

Schlieren images reveal supersonic shock waves

August 27, 2015

NASA researchers in California are using a modern version of a 150-year-old German photography technique to capture images of shock waves created by supersonic airplanes. Over the past five years scientists from NASA's Armstrong ...

Interactive tool lifts veil on the cost of nuclear energy

August 24, 2015

Despite the ever-changing landscape of energy economics, subject to the influence of new technologies and geopolitics, a new tool promises to root discussions about the cost of nuclear energy in hard evidence rather than ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.