Toshiba launches 13 Megapixel, 1.12um, CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction

Jul 05, 2013
Toshiba launches 13 Megapixel, 1.12µm, CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction

Toshiba Corp. today announced the launch of "T4K37", a 1.12µm, 13 Megapixel BSI CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction (CNR). Mass production starts today.

The integrated CNR circuit makes it possible for the product, fabricated with the industry's smallest class 1.12µm pixel process, to achieve the same signal-to-noise ratio as equivalent products fabricated with 1.4µm pixel process.

The T4K37 also incorporates a high dynamic range (HDR) function that faithfully reproduces dark and bright areas in high contrast images. The product's high frame rate of 30 fps at full resolution reduces delays in imaging, resulting in less shutter lag, and allows continuous shooting.

Explore further: Technology turns eyewear into a smart device capable of displaying visual information

More information: www.semicon.toshiba.co.jp/eng/… r/1300033_37652.html

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