Technology for cars to talk to each other urged

Jul 23, 2013 by Joan Lowy
This Feb. 16, 2012 file photo shows investigators viewing the scene of a school bus crash in Chesterfield, N.J. Federal investigators are expected to make new school bus safety recommendations based on fatal accidents in New Jersey and Florida last year. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) meets Tuesday to consider a report on the probable cause of an accident in Chesterfield, N.J., in which a dump truck slammed into the back left side of a school bus, spinning the bus around until it collided with a traffic signal pole. An 11-year-old girl was killed and five other students—including the girl's two sisters—were seriously injured. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

(AP)—Federal accident investigators are recommending the government set performance standards for new safety technology that allows cars and trucks to talk to each other and then require the technology be installed in all new vehicles.

The National Transportation Safety Board made the recommendation Tuesday in response to fatal school bus accidents at intersections in New Jersey and Florida last year.

Vehicles equipped with the technology can continuously communicate over wireless networks, exchanging information on location, direction and speed 10 times a second. A computer analyzes the information and issues danger warnings to drivers, often before they can see the other vehicle.

NTSB officials said the technology holds great promise to reduce deaths and injuries caused by crashes at intersections.

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