Privacy—the online generation wants it

Jun 13, 2013 by Martha Irvine

As the debate over government surveillance rages on, there's an assumption that young people will be the least concerned about privacy.

Turns out, many young people want to keep their personal information to themselves—in some cases, more than their elders.

That showed up most recently in a poll done for the for the People & the Press and The Washington Post.

Fifty-one percent of young adults, ages 18 to 29, said it was "more important for the federal government to investigate possible terrorist threats, even if that intrudes on personal privacy."

But 45 percent said personal privacy was more important. That number compared with less than a third of adults, age 30 and older, who said the same.

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