Los Angeles cabbies protest ride-sharing apps

Jun 25, 2013

Hundreds of taxis have staged a noisy Los Angeles protest against ride-sharing services that use smartphone apps.

About 200 cabs honked their horns and circled City Hall Tuesday morning.

The protest came one day after the city's transportation department issued cease-and-desist letters to companies such as Uber that allow consumers to book rides online with limo companies and private drivers.

Cabbies contend they're "bandit cabs" that compete with LA-, and a City Council committee on Wednesday will consider new regulations.

However, Uber founder and CEO Travis Kalanick says the San Francisco-based company already is legal under an agreement with that requires driver and insurance.

He says Uber has hooked up thousands of drivers with hundreds of thousands of customers in 35 cities worldwide.

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